Lisa Viscidi

United States  |  Director, Energy, Climate Change & Extractive Industries Program, Inter-American Dialogue

+1-202-463-2571 ˙ lviscidi@thedialogue.org ˙

This post is also available in: Spanish

Lisa Viscidi is the director of the Energy, Climate Change & Extractive Industries Program at the Inter-American Dialogue. A specialist in Latin American energy issues, Viscidi has written numerous reports and articles on energy policy and regulations, oil and gas markets, climate change, sustainable transport, social and environmental impacts of natural resources development, and the geopolitics of energy in the region.

Before joining the Dialogue, she was New York bureau chief and Latin America team leader for Energy Intelligence Group and subsequently a manager in the energy practice at Deloitte. She has also served as director of EntreMundos, a nonprofit organization based in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.

Ms. Viscidi’s articles have been published in The Financial Times, The New York Times, Foreign Policy, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, and Foreign Affairs. She frequently presents at conferences and universities throughout the United States and Latin America and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, and other news outlets. She was called to testify before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs’ Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere in 2017. Viscidi received a Fulbright Specialist grant in 2017 to teach a course on climate change and environmental policy at the Universidad del Rosario in Bogotá. She currently serves on the Leadership Council for the National Capital Area Chapter of the US Association for Energy Economics.

Viscidi conducted her undergraduate work in history at the George Washington University and the University of Barcelona and completed a master’s degree in Latin American studies with a focus on economic development and public policy from New York University. Viscidi speaks English, Spanish, and Portuguese.


Analysis See all

Amazon rainforest Video

Can Biden Woo the World on Climate Change?

In an interview with BBC’s Business Daily, Lisa Viscidi, director of the Energy, Climate Change, and Extractive Industries Program, discussed President Biden’s climate foreign policy, deforestation in the Amazon, and US-Brazil relations.

Cover of UCSD US-Mexico Forum 2025 Energy & Sustainability Report showing a wind farm

US-Mexico Forum 2025: Energy and Sustainability Report

The world is in a transition to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 that will change the way we use and produce energy and shape the sustainability of our planet. This paper, published by UC San Diego, addresses how Mexico and the United States can use their energy resources to deliver jobs, economic prosperity, and social justice at this transformational juncture in history, examining three areas fundamental to the US-Mexico energy relationship: sustainability; hydrocarbons; and gas, power, and renewables.

Lisa Viscidi speaks on a panel about China's involvement in the Latin American energy sector. Video

Security Challenges in Latin America

On February 25, the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and the William J. Perry Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies held a webinar on security challenges in Latin America. Lisa Viscidi, director of the Energy, Climate Change & Extractive Industries Program at the Dialogue, spoke about China’s role in the region’s energy sector and the US response. 


Blog See all

Colombia: To Frack or Not to Frack?

For over a decade Colombians have been debating whether or not to allow oil companies to use hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to produce oil and gas from shale rock, a technique that has been controversial in many countries. The high court’s decision last week to uphold a moratorium on fracking suggests the increasingly polarized debate is far from over.

˙Lisa Viscidi


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Press Mentions See all

"The [Mexican] president’s goal is to 'return their monopolies' by bringing the energy sector under state control — even if that means promoting dirtier fossil fuels and contributing more carbon emissions."