Security & Drug Policy

Latin America’s citizens persistently cite rising levels of violence as their main concern. Undoubtedly, developments linked to heightened insecurity and often tied to the drug trade undermine democratic processes and stunt economic growth. The Inter-American Dialogue’s work on security examines criminal trends throughout Latin America and promotes exchange between US and regional analysts, policymakers, journalists, and business leaders on how to address this growing challenge. Since 2008, the Dialogue has also worked to supply Latin American governments and nongovernmental organizations with independent analysis on current drug control policies as well as non-traditional or alternative strategies.


Analysis See all

collage of panelists with map of the Americas Video

Renewed Cooperation in a Troubled Hemisphere – Towards the Summit of the Americas

On March 31, 2022, the Inter-American Dialogue hosted a public event to present its biennial Sol M. Linowitz policy report titled: “The Case for Renewed Cooperation in a Troubled Hemisphere: Towards the Ninth Summit of the Americas”. During the event, panelists discussed the main findings and recommendations of the report and analyzed the current state of regional and hemispheric cooperation.

blue report cover for Linowitz report

The Case for Renewed Cooperation in a Troubled Hemisphere

Across the Americas, political leadership committed to greater collaboration to tackle health, social, economic, and political challenges has been sorely lacking. The Dialogue is pleased to present the 2022 Linowitz report “The Case for Renewed Cooperation in a Troubled Hemisphere,” which provides an analysis of the interrelated challenges facing the Western Hemisphere today and policy proposals to enhance collaboration across the hemisphere, all with an eye towards the Ninth Summit of the Americas.


Press Mentions See all

This marks the culmination of a deeply flawed US policy that failed to confront early on the criminality and corruption of the Honduran president in exchange for his cooperation on migration. It’s not a happy story, or one the United States should be proud of, but one maybe the United States will learn from.
The Merida Initiative is indeed dead. Mexico is expected to press for significant US assistance and investment in the southern part of the country, but with budget pressures and other priorities in Washington, US officials are unlikely to be receptive.