Latin America Advisor

A Daily Publication of The Dialogue

Can Fernández Win Argentina’s Presidency Again?

Argentine President Alberto Fernández and his Vice President, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, are not on speaking terms and lambaste each other in public, Kezia McKeague writes below. // File Photo: Argentine Government. Argentine President Alberto Fernández and his Vice President, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, are not on speaking terms and lambaste each other in public, Kezia McKeague writes below. // File Photo: Argentine Government.

Argentine President Alberto Fernández said on May 10 that he will be seeking re-election in next year’s presidential race. A Peronist, Fernández was recently able to restructure Argentina’s IMF debt in a $44 billion deal, although the politically charged talks exposed sharp fissures within the ruling coalition. How have Fernández’s approval ratings changed over the course of his presidency, and how much support does he have now? What are his biggest challenges leading up to next year’s elections, and what will be his primary campaign commitments? How will tensions within his Frente de Todos coalition affect his chances of a second presidential term?

 

Kezia McKeague, regional director at McLarty Associates: “President Fernández’s approval ratings have continued to fall since a peak at the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic. Recent polling reflects societal perceptions of a weak president unable to unify his fractious governing coalition or address Argentina’s persistently high inflation. According to a poll this month by Poliarquía, Fernández’s personal approval rating has declined to 28 percent, while his negative rating has risen to 46 percent—the worst levels since he took office. The disaffected vice president, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, is also polling at historic lows. Despite minimal prospects for re-election, Fernández needs to say that he will be a candidate to stay relevant, while continuing to promise compliance with the International Monetary Fund agreement and improved economic growth. His principal challenges are twofold: the loss of purchasing power of Frente de Todos voters impacted by accelerating inflation and the coalition’s internal battles, which are worse than ever…”

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The Inter-American Dialogue publishes the Latin America Advisor every business day for a distinguished membership of informed corporate leaders, scholars, and government officials invested in Latin America’s development and future. The Advisor‘s highly regarded Q&A section covers questions submitted by subscribers themselves. Commentators regularly include heads of state, business leaders, diplomats, economists, analysts, and thought leaders from around the world. Many of the world’s largest and fastest-growing companies subscribe to the Advisor. To subscribe click here or for more information, contact Erik Brand, publisher of the Advisor, at ebrand@thedialogue.org.


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Erik Brand

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E. ebrand@thedialogue.org

Gene Kuleta

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Mark Kennedy

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