Shifter: “Guaidó is the leader that we have not seen from the opposition in the last 20 years”

CGTN / Youtube

Michael Shifter, president of the Inter-American Dialogue, participated on CGTN’s World Insight where he discussed topics such as the international community’s approach to the Venezuelan crisis, the difference between the US’ approach to Venezuela and its approach to other transitions, and the risks of the Trump administration’s tough rhetoric towards Venezuelan officials.

Comments from Michael Shifter:

“Washington, along with more than fifty other countries, have recognized Juan Guaidó as the interim president and regard president Maduro as illegitimate, and so there is a call for a transition and new elections. […] There are, of course, governments and countries who reject that, but I think that what has been striking is the extent of broad international support for a transition with free and open elections.”

“There is a contrast between the Venezuelan situation and US history [of regime change]. The US is not working unilaterally, its working in concert with most Latin American countries, Canada, and the major European countries. I think that the reason why these countries have come around is because we have a new element in the whole situation. His name is Juan Guaidó, he is a leader that we have not seen from the opposition over the last 20 years who connects with a lot of Chavista sectors and people who supported Maduro from the beginning, and countries probably think that if there is a change of government in Venezuela that there is an opposition that has the capacity to govern because it has a leader, it has a strategy, and is united.”

“I think that the risk of fracturing this coalition is this rhetoric from Washington and the threats that we are hearing from president Trump, Senator Rubio, and John Bolton directed to the generals.”

Watch the full interview in CGTN: