Bruno Binetti

Argentina  |  Non-Resident Fellow

+1-202-822-900 ˙ bbinetti@thedialogue.org

Bruno Binetti is a non-resident research fellow with the office of the president at the Inter-American Dialogue, based in Buenos Aires. He was previously a research assistant at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars and has also worked as a legislative aide in the Argentine Congress. Binetti holds a BA in international studies from Torcuato Di Tella University and an MA in international affairs and development from George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, where he was a Fulbright Scholar. He writes on Latin American political and economic trends and China- Latin America relations and has taught courses at Torcuato Di Tella University and the Catholic University of Argentina. 


Analysis See all

Geopolítica de la crisis venezolana

Ante el bloqueo doméstico y externo de la crisis en Venezuela, Europa podría desempeñar un papel crucial gracias a su relativa distancia del conflicto y buena imagen en la región.

Promesas Incumplidas: América Latina Hoy

El libro busca hacer un balance de donde se encuentra América Latina en una serie de temas cruciales: desarrollo socioeconómico, seguridad y violencia, estado de derecho, crecimiento económico, integración regional y relaciones con el mundo.

Can the ‘Landmark’ EU-Mercosur Trade Deal Be Successfully Implemented?

After 20 years of on-and-off negotiations, leaders from the European Union and South America’s Mercosur trade bloc announced late last month that they had reached a sweeping trade agreement encompassing 800 million people and almost a quarter of the global economy. In an email interview with WPR, Bruno Binetti, a Buenos Aires-based research fellow at the Inter-American Dialogue, discusses the many obstacles standing in the way of the deal’s successful implementation. 


Blog See all

Argentina: Back to Normal

Mauricio Macri’s failure confirms that there seems to be no politically sustainable way to open up and reform Argentina’s economy. The long-term benefits of liberalizing, improving competitiveness and reducing fiscal spending might be clear in theory, but the immediate social costs of these policies are simply too high for Argentines to bear.

˙Bruno Binetti


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Press Mentions See all

Many of these leaders that are pushing for the Prosur initiative criticized UNASUR for being a politicized institution that responded to the interests of left-wing leaders such as Hugo Chavez or Lula in Brazil […] I think they are doing the exact same thing with Prosur. How would this institution survive after the incumbents leave office? That is the key question. If we are going to create new institutions every time there is a political shift in Latin America then we are not going to build real sustainable integration.
Both [Bolsonaro and Macri] agree that Mercosur should be a more flexible bloc, where countries have the freedom to negotiate free trade agreements with third countries instead of negotiating together as they have done so far, despite the resistance of industries in both countries.