Bruno Binetti

Argentina  |  Non-Resident Fellow

+1-202-822-900 ˙ bbinetti@thedialogue.org

Bruno Binetti is a non-resident research fellow with the office of the president at the Inter-American Dialogue, based in Buenos Aires. He was previously a research assistant at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars and has also worked as a legislative aide in the Argentine Congress. Binetti holds a BA in international studies from Torcuato Di Tella University and an MA in international affairs and development from George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, where he was a Fulbright Scholar. He writes on Latin American political and economic trends and China- Latin America relations and has taught courses at Torcuato Di Tella University and the Catholic University of Argentina. 


Analysis See all

Juan Guaidó’s Uprising Failed. What’s Next for Venezuela?

Venezuela’s stalemate will not last forever, but an immediate and easy return to democracy is highly unlikely. The quicker the opposition and its international supporters adapt their strategies to this hard reality, the sooner the country can begin to find a way out of this unprecedented crisis.

Video

Venezuela: marchas en medio del apagón

Bruno Binetti, non-resident fellow del Diálogo Interamericano, conversó con TN Internacional sobre los sucesos más recientes de la crisis venezolana y los grupos que disputan el poder en el país latinoamericano.


Blog See all

Argentina: Optimism, but no Euphoria

Mauricio Macri has good reason to celebrate: Argentines just gave a strong endorsement to his reform agenda. To capitalize on these results, Macri will need to pick his battles carefully, resolve inconsistencies in his economic program, and show concrete results to maintain the trust of investors and citizens alike.

˙Bruno Binetti


Press Mentions See all

Many of these leaders that are pushing for the Prosur initiative criticized UNASUR for being a politicized institution that responded to the interests of left-wing leaders such as Hugo Chavez or Lula in Brazil […] I think they are doing the exact same thing with Prosur. How would this institution survive after the incumbents leave office? That is the key question. If we are going to create new institutions every time there is a political shift in Latin America then we are not going to build real sustainable integration.
Both [Bolsonaro and Macri] agree that Mercosur should be a more flexible bloc, where countries have the freedom to negotiate free trade agreements with third countries instead of negotiating together as they have done so far, despite the resistance of industries in both countries.