Analysis

Crews from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Waesche offload nearly 660 kilograms of narcotics

The Pandemic is Disrupting Organized Crime, But Not Necessarily for the Better

Covid-19 is transforming organized crime. In addition to heightening the risk of violence, the pandemic is also indirectly strengthening the social, economic, and political clout of several criminal organizations in the same way that the Italian mafia and Japanese Yakuza emerged stronger after the great dislocations of the Second World War. Crime kingpins know full well that law enforcement and criminal justice systems are overstretched, and that prisons are bursting at the seams. They also know that an economic depression is coming, which may increase the risk of violence. It is not entirely clear if governments are similarly alert.

Robert Muggah

Articles & Op-Eds ˙ ˙ Unfulfilled Promises: Latin America Today

Mexico’s Supreme Court in November overturned a law that formalized the use of troops to fight gangs. // File Photo: Mexican Government.

Should Mexican Troops Keep Fighting Cartels?

Is López Obrador’s plan to form a National Guard to combat organized crime a good idea?

Monica de Bolle, Gonzalo Escribano, Amanda Mattingly, Raúl Benítez Manaut

Latin America Advisor ˙

Violence in Central America: Do no harm, Mr. Trump

Sending back 200,000 Salvadorans to an already strained region flies in the face of the objectives of the Alliance for Prosperity, and is a surefire way to worsen the social ills that lie at the root of the massive exodus to the United States. A chaotic Central America is a story with no winners except criminal syndicates.

Kevin Casas-Zamora

Articles & Op-Eds ˙ ˙ Global Americans

Central America

Central America faces a wide range of challenges in the global context, of which organized crime, access to trade and financing, and outbound migration are a few. This is a compilation of the most relevant Dialogue’s reports on the region.

Articles & Op-Eds ˙

Twelve Myths In The Fight Against Drug-Trafficking

The intricacy to understand public information related to the fight against drug-trafficking, has resulted in the emergence of a series of myths and fallacies surrounding the violence derived from the so-called “war against drugs.”

Joaquín Villalobos

Articles & Op-Eds ˙ ˙ Nexos