Analysis

The Covid-19 pandemic may push millions of people into hunger in Latin America and the Caribbean, according to the United Nations World Food Program. A Salvadoran family that participates in a World Food Program initiative is pictured above. // File Photo: WFP.

Where Are Latin Americans Most At Risk of Starvation?

A Latin America Advisor Q&A featuring experts’ takes on food insecurity in the region amid Covid-19 and the role of the government, the private sector and multilateral organizations in ensuring citizens have access to food.

Devry Boughner Vorwerk, Lidia Fromm Cea, Diana Chavez, Martín Piñeiro

Latin America Advisor ˙

A vendor in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, is pictured above.

How Can Latin America Help Its Most Vulnerable?

In what ways is Covid-19 affecting informal workers in the Americas, and which governments have implemented the best measures to protect informal sectors, both in terms of health care services and economic relief?

Santiago Levy, Betilde Muñoz-Pogossian, Sebastián Acha, Lauren M. Allen, Audriana Rodriguez, Charles T. Call

Latin America Advisor ˙

Poverty is on the rise in countries facing economic recession such as Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela, Nora Lustig writes below. // File Photo: Argentine Government.

What More Can Latin America Do to Reduce Poverty?

What factors are shaping extreme poverty rates in the region, and how should governments confront this challenge?

Jaana Remes, Nora Lustig, Claudio Loser, Camilo Arriagada Luco

Latin America Advisor ˙

The Challenges Facing Democracy in Latin America: How to Govern Better

“I was held at three concentration camps for more than one year; the key was to survive. Then I was expelled and I lived in exile for 10 years, barred from returning to the country. Many suffered much more than I did. […] During those years, I learned another lesson: If you allow yourself to sink into the justified bitterness and let your spirit to become contaminated with a negative animus, you cannot persuade and help mobilize others to build a better society. Therefore, the task was to build a new political and social force, and to battle for a better world, in liberty, without dictatorship.” Sergio Bitar receiving the Guillermo el O´Donnell Democracy Award and Lectureship 2017

Sergio Bitar

Presentations ˙

Nicaragua

A compilation of the Dialogue’s reports, articles and presentations on the most important issues shaping Nicaragua’s development.

Articles & Op-Eds ˙

Argentina’s National and Regional Development: A New Path Forward?

Regional development is the key for Argentina’s future. The new administration has developed long-term plans to eliminate poverty and inequality in Argentina. The priority is to generate efficient and sustainable programs by strengthening institutions, promoting dialogue and integration with provincial governments, and focusing on quality.

Laura Campiglia de Méndez

Event Summaries ˙

Fiscal Policy, Inequality & the Ethnic Divide in Guatemala

Guatemala is among the most unequal countries in Latin America. Fiscal policy has done very little to reduce inequality and poverty overall and along ethnic lines.

Nora Lustig, Maynor Cabrera, Hilcías E. Morán

Articles & Op-Eds ˙ ˙ Science Direct

Will Poverty Reduction Remain Stalled?

With regional growth expected to be relatively low this year, will efforts at poverty reduction remain stalled?

Nora Lustig, Alfredo González-Reyes, Paula Lucci

The Distributional Impact of Fiscal Policy in South Africa

This paper, published uses the 2010/11 Income and Expenditure Survey for South Africa to analyze the progressivity of the main tax and social spending programs and quantify their impact on poverty and inequality.

Nora Lustig, Gabriela Inchauste, Mashekwa Maboshe, Catriona Purfield, Ingrid Woolard

Reports ˙ ˙ Download Report

Comparing the Incidence of Taxes and Social Spending in Brazil and the United States

How much do the Western Hemisphere’s two largest economies and most populous countries, Brazil and the United States, redistribute through social spending and taxes? Although the United States has an income per capita four times as large as Brazil’s, the countries share similarities that make this comparison interesting.

Nora Lustig, Sean Higgins, Whitney Ruble, Timothy Smeeding

Reports ˙ ˙ Download Report