Tamar Ziff

United States  |  Program Assistant, Peter D. Bell Rule of Law Program , Inter-American Dialogue

202-463-2564 ˙ tziff@thedialogue.org

Tamar Ziff joined the Inter-American Dialogue in 2018 as a Program Assistant for the Peter D. Bell Rule of Law Program. She graduated from the University of Virginia with a degree in Political and Social Thought, and has worked with the New York Times in Paris, the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) in Tel Aviv, and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) in D.C. Tamar has lived in Israel, Peru, Venezuela, and Italy, and is fluent in English, Spanish, and Hebrew.


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Mandates for Change: Anticorruption and Latin America’s New Leaders

On May 23, the Inter-American Dialogue in partnership with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) hosted a panel called “Mandates for Change: Anticorruption and Latin America’s New Leaders” as the third and final installment of the joint Dialogue/IDB “Anticorruption, Transparency and Intergrity” Symposia series.


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Can Colombia Make Peace with the JEP?

President Duque must confront a new test of his leadership rather than put the JEP controversy behind him. Duque has remained silent on the referendum thus far, but now must decide whether to accept the judgment of the Colombian Congress and Constitutional Court and allow the transitional justice process to move forward, or join his mentor Uribe’s continuing efforts to undermine the JEP.

˙Tamar Ziff

Turning Back the Clock in Latin America

Even in more stable countries like Chile, disaffection with democracy pervades. Democracy in Latin America is and will always be an evolving issue. In November 2018, a Latinobarometro poll showed that only 48% of Latin Americans believed in democracy as the best form of government, the lowest percentage in decades. One of the more…

˙Tamar Ziff

Khashoggi Killing Casts an Uncomfortable Light on Latin America

The murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi last month prompted worldwide outrage and a business backlash that has refocused attention on the safety of journalists. Latin America and the Caribbean was the deadliest part of the world in 2017 for journalists, with more than a quarter of murders taking place in the region.

˙Leonie Rauls