Analysis

The government of Argentine President Alberto Fernández reached a major debt renegotiation deal with bondholders earlier this month. // File Photo: Argentine Government.

Has Argentina Struck a Good Deal With Creditors?

A Latin America Advisor Q&A featuring experts’ takes on Argentina’s recent restructuring debt deal with foreign bondholders.

Bruno Binetti, Kezia McKeague, Lisa M. Schineller

Latin America Advisor ˙

Michael Shifter

Shifter: “Nadie duda que Biden conoce la región, que le importa la región”

Michael Shifter, presidente del Diálogo Interamericano, habló con Rafael Mathus Ruiz sobre la llegada de Biden a la presidencia y el optimismo que genera en América Latina. La conversación también exploró los desafíos que Washington tiene por delante y el efecto que los mismos podrían tener para la construcción de alianzas entre Estados Unidos y América Latina. 

Michael Shifter, Rafael Mathus

Interviews ˙ ˙ La Nación

Video

Evo Morales en Argentina, elecciones en Bolivia e inflación argentina

Michael Shifter fue invitado a ‘Cuestión de Poder’ de NTN24, donde comentó sobre las declaraciones de Evo Morales en Argentina, las próximas elecciones bolivianas, y el rol de Alberto Fernández en la inflación argentina.

Michael Shifter, Gustau Alegret, Gustau Alegret

Interviews ˙ ˙ NTN24

Alberto Fernandez speaking

Will Argentina’s Fernandez Punt on a Deal With the IMF?

In a vitriolic address to Argentina’s Congress on March 1, President Alberto Fernandez put to rest any illusions that he would be a moderating influence on his vice president and political mentor, former President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner. During his speech, the president attacked Cristina Fernandez’s traditional enemies, including the press, the judiciary, and the political opposition. More surprisingly, he also criticized the IMF, despite being in the middle of discussions to renegotiate Argentina’s $44 billion debt.

Bruno Binetti

Articles & Op-Eds ˙ ˙ World Politics Review

Latin America: The Political Outlook

What is the political outlook in Latin America?  Will Brazil’s Congress continue to govern independent of the erratic, but somewhat business-friendly President Jair Bolsonaro? Will Mexico’s nationalist-leftist president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (popularly known as AMLO) try to extend his power? Will Argentina’s new president Alberto Fernandez govern independently of his vice president Cristina Kirchner? Will Colombia become a new Chile in terms of riots? What will happen in Chile this year? And will Peru be able to return to political stability? Michael Shifter discussed in this interview with Latinvex.

Michael Shifter, Christopher Sabatini , Joachim Bamrud

Interviews ˙ ˙ Latinvex

Sergio Massa with Michael Shifter

Private Meeting with Sergio Massa

On June 16 the Inter-American Dialogue hosted a private meeting with Sergio Massa, President of the House of Representatives of Argentina, on the political and economic challenges during the Fernández administration, and the state and future of US-Argentina relations.

Dylan Gervasio

Event Summaries ˙

will Macri’s economic package alleviate citizens’ economic woes in the short and long terms, and will they win him support ahead of the October presidential election?

Will New Economic Measures Boost Argentina’s Macri?

Will Macri’s economic package alleviate Argentina’s economic woes, and will they win him support ahead of the October presidential election?

Claudio Loser, Megan Cook, Horacio Verbitsky, Andrés Asiain, Jorge Castro

Latin America Advisor ˙

Grupo de Trabajo en reunión

32ª Reunión Anual del Grupo de Trabajo sobre América Latina

La 32ª reunión del Grupo de Trabajo sobre América Latina (LAWG por sus siglas en inglés) tuvo lugar el 9 de diciembre en Washington, DC. En esta reunión, el grupo prestó especial atención a los disturbios y protestas que se vieron en la región en 2019.

Irene Estefanía, Melanie Ordoñez

Event Summaries ˙

Alberto Fernandez speaking

Mercosur’s Divisions Are Pushing It to a Breaking Point

Relations between the four members of South America’s Mercosur trade bloc—Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay—are at their worst since the group’s establishment three decades ago. If the bloc is not up to the task of adapting to the 21st century, it may be time to set its members free to pursue their own trade and development goals.

Bruno Binetti

Articles & Op-Eds ˙ ˙ World Politics Review