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CHINA, LATIN AMERICA, AND THE CHANGING ARCHITECTURE OF TRANS-PACIFIC ENGAGEMENT


CHINA, LATIN AMERICA,
AND THE CHANGING ARCHITECTURE OF TRANS-PACIFIC ENGAGEMENT

The Inter-American Dialogue
and
The Latin American Studies Association (LASA) Section for Asia and the Americas

Sponsored by Open Society Foundations

Wednesday, May 29, 2013
Inter-American Dialogue Conference Room
1211 Connecticut Ave, NW Suite 510
Washington, DC 20036

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China’s trade with Latin America reached US$ 197 billion in the first three quarters of 2012, but trans-Pacific relations continue to operate largely through bilateral channels. Latin American nations are nevertheless increasingly interested in multilateral strategies for advancing common interests vis-à-vis Asia and managing growing Chinese investment ($10.1 billion in 2011). In 2012 Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru (together representing 40 percent of Latin America’s GDP) inaugurated the Pacific Alliance, which according to Chilean President Sebastian Piñera, seeks “free trade and economic integration, with a clear orientation toward Asia.” Chile, Mexico, and Peru are also party to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, which aim to regulate “behind the border” issues such as intellectual property and dispute resolution between governments and private investors.

While these nascent agreements endeavor to harmonize trans-Pacific trade and investment, China is not involved the formulation of either. How then, are they understood in China? How will they impact China’s interests in Latin America and in Asia, influence China’s existing agreements with signatory and non-signatory countries, and affect other emerging agreements in which China has a stake, such as the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)? Meanwhile, how do Latin American countries intend to leverage emerging Trans-Pacific agreements to encourage further economic integration? This workshop explores these and other key questions underpinning the changing architecture of trans-Pacific engagement. Three senior Chinese experts on Pacific regionalism join researchers from Latin America, the United States and Australia to debate points of contention and explore common ground.

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9:00am               Introduction and Overview

•    Adrian Hearn (University of Sydney, LASA)
•    Margaret Myers (Inter-American Dialogue)

9:10 – 10:40       Session 1

•    Ariel Armony (University of Miami): Latin American perspectives on the TPP and the Pacific Alliance
•    Wen Jinyuan (Center for Strategic and International Studies, CSIS): Chinese responses to the Trans-Pacific Partnership
•    Zhang Xuegang (China Institute of Contemporary International Relations, CICIR): TPP and RCEP: New challenges and future cooperation in the Asia-Pacific
•    Discussant: Richard Feinberg (University of California-San Diego)

10:40 - 11:00     Coffee Break

11:00 - 12:30     Session 2

•    HE Harold Forsyth Mejía (Ambassador of Peru to the United States): Peru, the TPP, and the Pacific Alliance
•    HE Eduardo Medina Mora (Ambassador of Mexico to the United States): Mexico, the TPP, and the Pacific Alliance

•    Mauricio Mesquita-Moreira (Inter-American Development Bank): The TPP, China, and the Latin American countries left behind
•    Shen Minghui (Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, CASS): The evolving Asia-Pacific architecture: a Chinese perspective
•    Discussant: Gonzalo Sebastian Paz (American University)

12:30 - 1:30       Lunch

1:30 - 3:00         Session 3


•    Barbara Kotschwar (Peterson Institute for International Economics): Latin America’s role in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)
•    Kevin Gallagher (Boston University): TPP and financial fragility in the Pacific Rim
•    Han Feng (Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, CASS): China, the TPP, and the changing dynamics of the Pacific Rim
•    Discussant: Mireya Solis (American University and Brookings Institution)

3:00 - 3:30        Coffee Break

3:30 - 5:00        Public Event

•    Adrian Hearn (University of Sydney, LASA): Opening Remarks
•    HE Felipe Bulnes (Ambassador of Chile to the United States): Chile, the TPP, and the Pacific Alliance
•    Barbara Kotschwar (Peterson Institute for International Economics): Latin America’s role in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)
•    Zhang Xuegang (China Institute of Contemporary International Relations, CICIR): TPP and RCEP: New challenges and future cooperation in the Asia-Pacific
•    Moderator: Carla Hills (Hills & Associates)

Observers registered to date:

Ben Cas, Australian Embassy in Washington, D.C.
HE Ramón Gil-Casares, Ambassador of Spain
R. Evan Ellis, National Defense University
Daniel Erikson, U.S. Department of State
Peter Winn, Tufts University
Javier Herrera, Institute of Development Research (IRD-DIAL), Paris
Carlos Alzugaray Treto, Temas: Journal of Political Science, Havana
Cynthia Watson, National War College
Erica Downs, Brookings Institution
Maria Teresa Montes de Oca Choy, University of Havana
Jorge Romeu, Embassy of Spain
Laura Atar, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT)