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July 16, 2014: Senate Testimony: Challenges at the Border: Examining and Assessing the Root Causes Behind the Rise in Apprehensions at the Southern Border
By Michael Shifter
More than 52,000 Central American children, passing through Mexico, have sought entry into the United States. Despite the broad agreement on the need to tackle the challenge, however, a fierce political debate in the United States has ensued. While a variety of proposals have been put forward to deal with the tragic and urgent situation, most of these are little more than stop-gap measures that seek to provide humane treatment to the children and either hasten or slow deportations of the minors. The bulk of President Obama’s $3.7 billion request to Congress, though targeted to essential purposes that mostly deal with current conditions on the US side of the border, is nonetheless unlikely to stem yet another wave of migrants coming from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador down the road.

July 11, 2014: ¿Qué debería hacerse respecto a los niños migrantes no acompañados?
By Nicolas Mariscal, Gretchen Kuhner, Carlos Arrazola, Arturo Sarukhan, Dan Stein, Robert Kaplan
Source: Latin America Advisor
Q: El gobierno de EE.UU. dice que sus agentes han detenido este año fiscal cerca de 52.000 niños no acompañados en la frontera sur, el doble del número 2013. Citando los altos costos de enfrentar el influjo, la diputada Rep. Candice Miller (R-Mich.) sugirió el mes pasado suspender la ayuda y derogar los acuerdos de libre comercio con México y los países centroamericanos para obligarlos a hacer más, mientras que otros líderes del Congreso bautizaron el problema como una crisis humanitaria. ¿Qué hay detrás del aumento de niños no acompañados que cruzan la frontera? ¿Qué deben hacer los Estados Unidos y los países de origen hacer sobre la situación? ¿Que tan seriamente afecta las relaciones entre Estados Unidos y sus vecinos?

July 9, 2014: What Should Be Done About Unaccompanied Child Migrants?
By Arturo Sarukhan, Dan Stein, Gretchen Kuhner, Robert N. Kaplan, Carlos Arrazola
Source: Latin America Advisor
The U.S. government says its agents have picked up some 52,000 unaccompanied children at the southern border this fiscal year, twice the 2013 number. Citing the high costs of dealing with the influx, Rep. Candice Miller (R-Mich.) last month suggested cutting off aid and repealing free-trade agreements with Mexico and Central American countries to spur them to do more, while other congressional leaders cast the issue as a humanitarian crisis. What is behind the spike in unaccompanied children crossing the border? What should the United States and countries of origin do about the situation? How seriously is the issue affecting relations between the United States and its neighbors?

June 30, 2014: La permanencia de la corrupción en Latinoamérica
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
A excepción de unos pocos países, la corrupción es endémica en toda América Latina. A pesar de la retórica de los dirigentes políticos de todas las tendencias ideológicas, afianzada por tratados regionales, planes nacionales, y miles de campañas, la región ha hecho escasos progresos para acabar, o incluso modestamente frenar, las prácticas de corrupción en los últimos 20 años.

June 26, 2014: Media Forum: Freedom of the Press and Digital Transformations in Latin America
By María José González Rivas
América Latina vive una verdadera transformación digital que está cambiando radicalmente la manera en que los usuarios reciben información y que obliga a los gobiernos a adecuar la regulación de la prensa a los nuevos tiempos. Y en toda esta discusión, la pregunta que prima es: ¿hay más o menos libertad de expresión en la región como resultado de su revolución digital y las nuevas legislaciones mediáticas?

June 25, 2014: U.S. Drug Policy in the Western Hemisphere
By Mackenzie Welch
Combating the drug trade has been at the top of the U.S. policy agenda in the Western Hemisphere for over a decade. Despite this focus and 6.7 billion dollars spent in intervention, violence and drug trafficking continue to threaten regional security. To address these persistent problems, Representatives Engel and Salmon have introduced the Western Hemisphere Drug Policy Commission Act, a law which would establish an independent directive to assess U.S. drug policy in Latin America and make recommendations for future efforts. Ambassador Simons from the Organization of American States has also spearheaded efforts to understand the issue with greater clarity. Speaking to an audience on Capitol Hill, the three experts laid out their plans for this commission.

June 24, 2014: Mexico’s Energy Reform: Assessing the Secondary Legislation
By Juan Osuna
Mexico is facing critical energy challenges. The country's energy reform and recently proposed implementing legislation are crucial for boosting the country’s natural gas production and supplying reliable, affordable electricity. Still, questions remain: Will Mexico see the projected boom in domestic gas production from shale and other resources? Will President Enrique Peña Nieto deliver on his promises to lower power prices and reduce subsidies? Will renewable energy developers have sufficient incentives for investment?

June 23, 2014: Financial Education and Inclusion in Mexico
By Jean Coleman
The results of a recent financial education project informed a wide-ranging discussion on financial inclusion strategies in Mexico, where less than one in three adults has an account at a formal financial institution and less than one in ten has saved money formally in the past year.

June 12, 2014: A Brighter Future for Mexico: The Promise and Challenge of Electricity Reform
By Lisa Viscidi and Paul Shortell
While Mexico’s oil and gas reform has stolen the limelight both at home and abroad, the electricity reform is arguably more critical to the country’s economic growth, trade and fiscal budget. High power generation costs, deficient infrastructure, and barriers to competition are leading Mexico on a path toward soaring industrial electricity tariffs and unsustainable energy subsidies. A sweeping overhaul of the country’s framework for the electricity and hydrocarbons sectors should reduce electricity prices. But while the government has taken important steps toward establishing the right energy framework, much work remains to be done -- and the many potential challenges and uncertainties mean that the reform is unlikely to bear fruit in the short term.

June 10, 2014: Symposium on Reproductive Rights in Latin America
By Josh Manley
On June 10, the Inter-American Dialogue and the Center for Reproductive Rights co-hosted the Symposium on Reproductive Rights to engage experts and policymakers on an important issue impacting women across Latin America.

June 6, 2014: Mexico's Energy Reform: What's Next for Gas and Electricity?
By Paul Shortell
On Friday, June 6, the Dialogue hosted a discussion on the implications of Mexico’s energy reform for the natural gas and electricity sectors. The session featured Horacio Cuevas, an energy regulatory expert with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and Nicolas Puga, a partner with Bates White Economic Consulting who advises electric utilities.

May 26, 2014: Se avecinan tormentas en la educación en América Latina
By Ariel Fiszbein
Source: El País
En El País, Ariel Fiszbein, director del Programa de Educación (PREAL), discute la reforma educativa en los países de América Latina. Aunque existen tensiones, argua Fiszbein, estas son extremadamente positivas y reflejan que la sociedad latinoamericana reconoce la importancia de la educación.

April 3, 2014: Report Launch: Economic Status and Remittance Behavior among Latin American and Caribbean Migrants in the Post-Recession Period
By Julia Yansura
The Inter-American Dialogue and the Multilateral Investment Fund, Member of the IDB Group, recently launched a new report, “Economic Status and Remittance Behavior among Latin American and Caribbean Migrants in the Post-Recession Period.”

April 3, 2014: Economic Status and Remittance Behavior among Latin American and Caribbean Migrants in the Post-Recession Period.
By Manuel Orozco with Mariellen Jewers
Latin American and Caribbean migrants have experienced a modest improvement since the 2008-09 recession. One in three migrants are in a “vulnerable” financial position, a situation that limits their ability to further remit larger amounts. As of 2013 these remittances are similar to 2010 levels. Although more immigrants are saving as compared to 2009, increases in income and full time work are not adequate enough to ensure the means to a robust improvement. Moreover, legal status is one factor affecting their financial strength.

April 3, 2014: Situación económica y envío de remesas de migrantes de América Latina y el Caribe en el periodo post-recesión
By Manuel Orozco con Mariellen Jewers
Este informe analiza la posición financiera actual y el comportamiento del envío de remesas de personas migrantes que viven Estados Unidos dentro del contexto de la crisis económica 2008-2009. El informe se basa en resultados de la encuesta realizada a una muestra de 2.000 migrantes de América Latina y el Caribe que residen en cinco de las principales ciudades de Estados Unidos.

March 20, 2014: Is Mexico Winning or Losing the Battle for Rule of Law?
By Arturo Sarukhan, Beatrice Rangel, Raúl Benítez Manaut, and David A. Shirk
Source: Latin America Advisor
Mexican authorities in early March announced that they had killed Nazario Moreno, a.k.a. "El Más Loco," the former head of the La Familia drug cartel and a leader of the Knights Templar cartel. Mexican troops this year also captured high-level drug cartel leaders Dionisio Loya Plancarte, "El Tío," of the Knights Templar and Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán, leader of the Sinaloa Cartel. Do these developments represent a significant advance for Mexico in the fight against drug trafficking, or are they just minor setbacks for the cartels? How would you rate President Enrique Peña Nieto's efforts to address the country's security situation? Is there more his administration should be doing that it is not?

February 28, 2014: What Did the 'Three Amigos' Summit Accomplish?
By Peter Hakim, Arturo Sarukhan, Andrés Rozental, and Carlo Dade
Source: Latin America Advisor
U.S. President Obama, Mexican President Peña Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Harper met last week for the annual North American Leaders' Summit. What did the summit accomplish, and on what issues did it fall short of its potential?

February 28, 2014: Pressing Issues in Central America and Mexico
By Caitlin Reilly
On February 28, the Inter-American Dialogue hosted a half-day Capitol Hill conference on the two most pressing issues that face the countries of Central America and Mexico—security and migration.

February 16, 2014: The Promise of a Pacific Alliance
By Michael Shifter
Source: La Tercera
Free trade supporters are cheering the Pacific Alliance and it is easy to understand why. Comprised of Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Chile, the bloc accounts for more than a third of Latin America’s gross domestic product and has moved quickly on a path to integrate their economies since it was formally established 20 months ago.

February 16, 2014: Promisoria Alianza del Pacífico
By Michael Shifter
Source: La Tercera
Los partidarios del libre comercio están animando la Alianza del Pacífico, y es fácil entender por qué. Compuesta por México, Colombia, Perú y Chile, el bloque representa más de un tercio del Producto Interno Bruto de América Latina y se ha movido rápidamente hacia la integración de sus economías desde que se estableció formalmente hace 20 meses.

February 4, 2014: Mexico y Estados Unidos: nuevas oportunidades
By Thomas F. "Mack" McLarty
Source: Reforma
Tras las últimas décadas, las crecientes interconexiones entre México y los EEUU -de nuestras economías, nuestra cultura y nuestros intereses- cuentan la historia de una transformación asombrosa. Hoy, tal vez por primera vez, las oportunidades compartidas en la relación claramente sobrepasan nuestras diferencias y apuntan a nuevas oportunidades.

February 4, 2014: From distant neighbors to natural partners
By Thomas F. "Mack" McLarty
Source: Miami Herald
Over the last decades, the growing connections between Mexico and the United States — of our economies, our cultures and our interests — tell a story of breathtaking transformation. Besides the concrete achievements of increased trade and investment, we see a striking change in tone from officials on both sides, from the suspicion and defensiveness of generations past to confidence, optimism and, increasingly, trust.

January 26, 2014: Why the U.S. should legalize marijuana
By Peter Hakim and Cameron Combs
Source: Miami Herald
Tiny Uruguay made waves a month ago by becoming the first nation anywhere to fully legalize the sale and use of recreational marijuana. Colorado and Washington, however, had already beaten them to the punch, and a handful of other states are expected soon to follow suit.

January 17, 2014: México - mudanças em curso
By Roberto Teixeira da Costa
Source: O Estado de S. Paulo
Entre as muitas razões que alteraram as expectativas dos investidores em relação ao Brasil, há, certamente, uma explicação bastante plausível que vem de fora: a virada que tem experimentado o México sob a administração do presidente Enrique Peña Nieto. Por que razão investidores estrangeiros não poderiam manter os dois maiores países da América Latina em sua lista prioritária de investimentos?

January 15, 2014: US-Latin America Trade and Investment in the 21st Century: What’s Next for Deepening Integration?
By J. F. Hornbeck
Since the turn of the millennium, trade and investment between the United States and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have continued to grow and transform—even in the face of global economic volatility and increased competitiveness within the world trading system. This paper presents an overview of US-Latin America trade and investment from 2000 to 2012, with special attention paid to Mexico and Brazil, the two largest LAC economies.

January 8, 2014: PISA and the State of Education in Latin America
By Ariel Fiszbein
Source: PREAL Blog
PISA plays a critical role in enabling international comparisons of results and giving a complementary perspective of the most frequent measurements of learning at the national level. It reminds us that we can learn from the experience of others, without suggesting that we should mechanically copy policies and programs.

January 8, 2014: La prueba PISA y el estado de la educación en América Latina
By Ariel Fiszbein
Source: PREAL Blog
PISA, así como otras pruebas internacionales, cumple un rol crítico al permitir la comparación de resultados que da una perspectiva complementaria a las más frecuentes mediciones de aprendizaje a nivel nacional. PISA nos recuerda que podemos aprender de la experiencia de otros, sin que eso implique copiar mecánicamente políticas y programas.

January 6, 2014: What Are the Best Options for Modernizing NAFTA?
By Arturo Sarukhán, Carl Meacham, Jeff Faux, Ben Beachy, and James R. Jones
Source: Latin America Advisor
U.S. Secretary of State Kerry said recently that he is exploring the possibility of deepening the North American Free Trade Agreement to strengthen trade ties with Canada and Mexico with an eye toward expanding the agreement to include other countries in the hemisphere. How significant of a priority should strengthening NAFTA be as compared to other trade agreements, and would other countries be interested in participating?

December 30, 2013: Four Top Stories from Latin America in 2013
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
In 2013, four news stories in Latin America stood out. All have long histories and huge implications. They are still evolving, and bear close watching in 2014.

December 30, 2013: Lo que le dejó el año a América Latina y que seguirá en 2014
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
En 2013 se destacaron cuatro grandes noticias en América Latina. Todas tienen largas historias y enormes implicaciones. Todavía están evolucionando, y estarán bajo vigilancia en 2014.

December 23, 2013: How Will Latin American Economies Perform in 2014?
By Alicia Bárcena, Alfredo Coutiño, and Erich Arispe
Source: Latin America Advisor
Economic growth in Latin America and the Caribbean has been in "low gear," the International Monetary Fund said in October. What will drive the region's economic growth in the coming year? Which countries will experience solid economic expansion in 2014, and which will struggle? Where have government policies done the most good or damage to growth?

December 20, 2013: What Does 2014 Hold for U.S.-Latin America Relations?
By Arturo Sarukhán, Rubens Barbosa, Peter Hakim, Julia Buxton, and Riordan Roett
Source: Latin America Advisor
What lies ahead for U.S.-Latin America relations in the coming year? To what extent will the Obama administration seek to strengthen ties in the region? How much will Latin American countries want to work with the United States?

December 20, 2013: The Top 2013 LGBT Stories from the Americas
By Javier Corrales and Cameron Combs
Source: Huffington Post
Our hemisphere is quickly becoming one of the most gay-friendly territories in the world. It has far and beyond the most people living with access to marriage equality, not to mention the largest pride celebration on Earth. Many countries in the Americas are expanding their safeguards against discrimination and boast some of the world's most vibrant LGBT movements. But not everything is advancing in a positive direction. This is our pick for the top LGBT stories - both positive and negative - from the Americas in 2013.

December 15, 2013: It's Time for Nafta 2.0
By Thomas F. "Mack" McLarty
Source: Wall Street Journal
Twenty years ago this month President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement into law. If there is one thing supporters and critics of this pact have always agreed on, it is the size of the stakes. In November 1993, Mr. Clinton, facing fierce opposition within his party, implored Congress to pass Nafta as a vote for the country's future, a sign that "we still have confidence in ourselves and our potential."

December 11, 2013: A Conversation on US Cooperation in Central America and Mexico
By Cameron Combs
Crime and violence are global problems, too big for any one county to tackle alone. But they are also highly local phenomena; their precise roots are as unique as the motive behind a single crime. This paradox was a central theme during a meeting of the Congressional Members Working Group focused on Central America. How can cooperation and international assistance on security issues adapt to local realities without becoming hopelessly complex?

December 4, 2013: A Celebration of US-Mexico Relations
By Humberto Galvan
San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro and former president of Mexico Ernesto Zedillo spoke on Monday, December 2nd at the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington during a private dinner with the Inter-American Dialogue’s Board of Directors.

November 27, 2013: Why and How Latin America Should Think About the Future
By Sergio Bitar
Over the past decade, many Latin American governments have made significant strides in developing domestic policies that have succeeded in reducing poverty and strengthening democratic institutions. Yet the impact of profound transformations in the global economy, climate change, and new information and communication technologies makes it clear that the region’s future will be inextricably connected to developments taking place beyond the borders of individual nations.

November 22, 2013: Migration and Development in Central America: Perceptions, Policies, and Further Opportunities
By Manuel Orozco and Julia Yansura
Migrants abroad have been a strong source of economic growth for nearly every country in the region. Public officials, however, have been largely unable to develop policies that effectively leverage the economic activities of migrants and harness their full economic potential.

November 22, 2013: Sub-Regional Dialogue on Citizen Security Policy
By Humberto Galvan
Governors, policy makers, and analysts gathered in Porto Alegre, Brazil on November 18 and 19 to participate in the Sub-Regional Dialogue on Citizen Security Policy, a two-day meeting convened by the Inter-American Development Bank, in collaboration with the Inter-American Dialogue, to discuss and examine the efforts of sub-national actors against crime and violence in Latin America.

November 19, 2013: Cuba's Government Must Broaden Reforms: Kerry
By Megan Cook
Cuba remains the exception to the Western Hemisphere's trajectory of strengthening democracy, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said in a speech Monday at the Organization of American States, as he called for the Cuban government to "embrace a broader political reform agenda.

November 18, 2013: Remarks on U.S. Policy in the Western Hemisphere
By US Secretary of State John Kerry
US Secretary of State John Kerry addressed US-Latin America relations for the first time in the United States since his appointment at an event co-sponsored by the Inter-American Dialogue and the Organization of American States.

November 18, 2013: Migration and Development: Current Trends and Policy Options
By Julia Yansura
On November 15, 2013 the Inter-American Dialogue organized a meeting on migration and development in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, co-sponsored by the Central American Bank for Economic Integration (CABEI) and the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH).

November 4, 2013: Reforma Fiscal en México
By Alicia Bárcena
Source: Reforma
La reciente aprobación legislativa del paquete de reformas fiscales impulsado por el ejecutivo, y concebidas originalmente al abrigo del Pacto por México, motiva reflexiones que apuntan a perfilar un balance parcial sobre sus avances, limitaciones y pendientes.

September 25, 2013: Shale Gas in Latin America
By Tim Stackhouse
The shale gas revolution has reached Latin America and its prodigious gas reserves. Can Latin America overcome political, geological, and economic challenges? Will it live up to its shale gas potential?

September 19, 2013: Negative Perceptions of Mexico Hurting U.S. Policy: Ambassador
By Megan Cook
Mexico's ambassador to the United States last Friday lambasted Hollywood for its negative portrayal of Mexicans in popular culture, asserting that an inaccurate perception of Mexicans is hurting the chances for passing meaningful U.S. immigration reforms and improving trade policy.

September 19, 2013: Democracy in Latin America
By Veronica Gaitan
Two prominent professors in the field of democratic governance took stock of the progress and challenges facing the region’s democracies.

September 19, 2013: State of the Remittance Industry: Trends and Challenges
By Eric Johnson
The Dialogue hosted a panel discussion on the current state of the remittance industry featuring representatives from many of the leading money transfer companies.

September 11, 2013: A Time for Action: Latin America and the Future
By Mary Dempsey
The failure to narrow the inequality gap in Latin America, a need for effective economic integration, and the importance of investment in infrastructure and education were among the issues spotlighted during the XVII Annual CAF Conference, the largest and most successful CAF Conference to date.

September 10, 2013: Will Teachers' Resistance Derail Mexico's Education Reforms?
By Reyes Tamez Guerra, Jeffrey Puryear, Andrés Rozental, and Sergio Bitar
Source: Latin America Advisor
Last week, Mexico's Congress gave final approval to an overhaul of the country's education system but will protests derail or significantly dilute the reforms? What are the most important parts of the overhaul, and how can they be implemented in the face of teacher resistance?

August 13, 2013: August Recess: A Time to Align Political Forces
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
August is a quiet month in Washington. The Congress is in recess for five weeks, until early September. When lawmakers return, they will face a number of crucial battles, including on the budget. In such a polarized political environment, none of these will be easy.

August 13, 2013: Un receso para alinear fuerzas políticas en EE.UU.
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
Agosto es un mes tranquilo en Washington. El Congreso está en receso durante cinco semanas, hasta principios de septiembre. Cuando los legisladores regresen, se enfrentarán a una serie de batallas cruciales, incluyendo la del presupuesto. En un entorno político tan polarizado, ninguna de estas va a ser fácil.

July 30, 2013: Mexico on the Regional and Global Stage
By Gustavo Orozco
Mexico has an ambitious growth and reform agenda. Ambassador Eduardo Medina Mora and Carnegie expert Uri Dadush joined the Dialogue to discuss just how Mexico can grow to assume the regional and global leadership role it aspires to.

July 17, 2013: Shale Gas in Latin America: Opportunities and Challenges
By David R. Mares
Is shale gas a viable new frontier for Latin America’s booming energy sector? Energy Expert David Mares analyzes the political, economic and environmental challenges that countries face in developing the next generation of hydrocarbon resources.

July 3, 2013: What's Really Behind South America's Wave of Street Protests?
By Henrique Rzezinski, Moisés Naím, Peter Hakim, and Moises Arce
Source: Latin America Advisor
A wave of street protests and strikes that broke out this month across Latin America took some officials and observers by surprise. Are these protests isolated events with unique causes or are there threads that unify them?

June 4, 2013: Measuring Latin America’s Commitment to Equality
By Estefania Ortiz
A discussion of the effectiveness of Latin American governments in reducing poverty and inequality. Are Latin American governments more committed to equality than in the past? Have their tax and spending policies improved? What policies and programs have been most effective in redistributing income? What more—or less—should governments be doing?

May 22, 2013: President Obama's Visit and the Outlook for US Relations with Mexico and Central America
By Rachel Schwartz
On May 22, the Inter-American Dialogue held a private Congressional dinner to reflect on the outcomes of President Obama's visit to Mexico and Costa Rica. The dinner was co-hosted by Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA) and Representative Michael McCaul (R-TX).

May 1, 2013: Which Mexico for Obama?
By Peter Hakim
Source: Reuters
When President Barack Obama meets this week with President Enrique Peña Nieto in Mexico, he will be visiting a country that was much maligned throughout his first term. But Mexico’s standing in the United States and internationally has increased dramatically — along with its national self-esteem.

April 29, 2013: President Obama's Visit to Central America and Mexico
By Rachel Schwartz
A special roundtable to discuss President Obama’s upcoming trip to Mexico and Costa Rica.

April 24, 2013: Women and the Judiciary in the Americas: Leadership and Outcomes (PDF)
By Inter-American Dialogue, League of Women Voters, and International Association of Women Judges
We are pleased to present this report on women in judicial leadership in the Americas. In recent decades, women in Latin America and the Caribbean have made tremendous strides towards achieving leadership in every sphere and at the highest levels.

April 24, 2013: La Mujer y el Poder Judicial en las Américas: Liderazgo y Resultados (PDF)
By Inter-American Dialogue, League of Women Voters, and International Association of Women Judges
Nos complace sobremanera presentar un informe sobre la mujer en cargos de responsabilidad judicial en las Américas, elaborado en el marco de los grandes avances que durante las últimas décadas las mujeres de América Latina y el Caribe vienen concretando en todos los ámbitos y al más alto nivel.

April 19, 2013: Obama returns to Latin America
By Peter Hakim
Source: Latin Pulse
Mexico and Central America present a test for the US. If Washington is unable respond to the opportunities in Mexico and the needs of Central America, it hard to imagine the US having any serious policy or strategy for the rest of Latin America.

April 16, 2013: Will Latin America’s Economic Success be Sustained? A Historical Perspective
By Leba Sable
On April 16th the Dialogue hosted a discussion of Latin America’s economic history and current trajectory featuring José Antonio Ocampo.

April 15, 2013: The Promise of a North America-European Union Free Trade Agreement
By Carla A. Hills, Jaime Serra, and Michael Wilson
Source: El Financiero
The United States and the European are discussing the possible launch of negotiations to create a U.S.-EU Trade Agreement. Enlarging the proposed negotiations to include all three North American nations, Canada, Mexico, and the United States would create a unique, historic and much larger opportunity that has the potential to give a real boost to the economies of all of the nations involved as well as to the global economy.

April 4, 2013: Obama mira otra vez al Sur
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
Que Obama viaje a México el próximo mes para encontrarse con Peña Nieto otra vez, destaca el hecho de que, de entre todas las naciones de América Latina, México es abrumadoramente preeminente para los intereses y prioridades de EE.UU..

April 4, 2013: Obama Heads South Again
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
That President Obama will be traveling to Mexico to meet with Peña Nieto again highlights the fact that, among the nations of Latin America, Mexico is overwhelmingly preeminent for US interests and priorities.

April 4, 2013: Security Roundtable with the Ambassadors of Central America
By Kimberly Covington
Central American countries have taken bold steps to address the region’s troubled security situation, but there are still many lessons to be learned, concluded security experts in a meeting with a group of the region’s ambassadors at a private roundtable cohosted by the Inter-American Dialogue and the Inter-American Development Bank.

March 25, 2013: What Will the Proposed Telecom Overhaul Mean for Mexico?
By Daniel Castro, Ramiro Tovar Landa, Andrés Rozental, and James R. Jones
Source: Latin America Advisor
The lower house of Mexico's Congress gave its approval Friday to a measure to overhaul the country's telecommunications industry and sent the legislation to the Senate. The reforms, proposed earlier this month by Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, are seen as an effort to break the dominance of billionaire Carlos Slim and broadcaster Televisa on the industry. What would the overhaul mean for the industry and for Mexico's economy in general? Will the reforms win the needed legislative approval? If Peña Nieto's telecom reform stumbles, does that mean trouble for other big reforms in the works, such as tax and energy sector reforms?

March 14, 2013: Criminal Violence in Mexico: Challenges for the Peña Nieto Administration
By Andres Quinche
International Crisis Group experts Javier Ciurlizza and Mark L. Schneider discuss Mexico's security challenges and new strategies from the Peña Nieto administration.

March 1, 2013: How Well Has Peña Nieto Performed in His First 100 Days?
By Rogelio Ramirez de la O, James R. Jones, Andrés Rozental, Pamela Starr, and Duncan Wood
Source: Latin America Advisor
This month, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto marks 100 days in office. Fiscal and energy reforms that Peña Nieto had been expected to tackle quickly have been put off until later this year, while the president and his party have shifted their immediate focus to reforms in the areas including education and telecommunications. How well has Peña Nieto performed in his first 100 days? Is he focusing the beginning of his presidency on the right goals? Will the 'Pact for Mexico' agreement between the PRI and the two largest opposition parties hold? How might Mexico's local elections this July alter the current course?

February 25, 2013: La palanca judicial
By Jesús Silva-Herzog Márquez
Source: Reforma
Podría entenderse la política como una batalla contra la inercia. Una búsqueda esencialmente física de movimiento -o, vista del otro lado, una resistencia frente a la amenaza de la tracción. Todo proyecto de reforma enfrenta una energía motriz a un peso quieto. El impulso político fundamental radica en las máquinas representativas, en las palancas de la administración pública, en la presión de los movimientos sociales.

February 20, 2013: What Does Mexico's Educational System Need to Improve?
By Reyes Tamaz Guerra, Jeffrey Puryear, Lucrecia Santibanez, Nicolas Mariscal
Billionaire Carlos Slim announced last month he is investing more than $300 million in connectivity, digital libraries and equipment for schools in Mexico. Beyond that, Slim is also underwriting translation of Khan Academy online course videos into Spanish, with a goal of having 1,000 videos translated by April. Is Slim's investment the sort of infusion that Mexico's school systems most need? Will it make a difference in addressing low levels of learning and widespread inequality in educational opportunity? Will other businesspeople in Mexico become more engaged in the country's schools, following Slim's example? How does Slim's initiative fit with the larger reforms to the education system announced by the Peña Nieto government?

February 19, 2013: Obama's State of the Union
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
After Barack Obama’s ambitious State of the Union speech a week ago, no one can justly accuse the US president of lacking a vision. Obama, more confident at the start of his second term, laid out a “wish list” of proposals.

February 19, 2013: El mensaje de la "unión" de Obama
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
Después del ambicioso discurso del Estado de la Unión de Barack Obama, hace una semana, nadie puede acusar al presidente de los EE.UU. de la falta de visión. Obama, con más confianza en el inicio de su segundo mandato, expuso una "lista de deseos" de propuestas.

February 7, 2013: Presentación del Reporte de la Comisión México-Estados Unidos del Inter-American Dialogue, Una Agenda Más Ambiciosa
By COMEXI
En un evento organizado por el Consejo Mexicano de Asuntos Internacionales (COMEXI), se presentó el Reporte elaborado por la Comisión México-Estados Unidos del Diálogo Interamericano (Inter-American Dialogue).

February 6, 2013: A More Ambitious Agenda: A Report of the Inter-American Dialogue’s Commission on Mexico-US Relations
By Allie Bobak
Members of a special Inter-American Dialogue Commission on Mexico-US relations gathered to discuss a report that calls for a more ambitious approach to this important, bilateral relationship.

February 6, 2013: A More Ambitious Agenda: A Report of the Inter-American Dialogue’s Commission on Mexico-US Relations (PDF)
By Carla Hills and Ernesto Zedillo
This report of a special Inter-American Dialogue Commission is a call to presidents Obama and Peña Nieto and their administrations to recognize the enhanced opportunities they have to forge cooperative approaches to the multiple challenges their two countries face.

February 6, 2013: Una Agenda Más Ambiciosa: Informe de la Comisión de Diálogo Interamericano sobre relaciones México-Estados Unidos (PDF)
By Carla Hills and Ernesto Zedillo
El informe de esta comisión especial de Diálogo Interamericano es un llamado a los presidentes Obama y Peña Nieto a reconocer la oportunidad que se les presenta de dar un enfoque más colaborativo a los múltiples desafíos que ambas partes enfrentan y a aprovechar los próximos cuatro años para trabajar en busca de soluciones conjuntas.

February 5, 2013: El gran paso con la reforma en EE.UU.
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
Hace sólo tres meses nadie creía que sería posible que el Congreso de EE. UU. aprobara una reforma migratoria integral en el corto plazo.

February 5, 2013: A big step for reform
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
Just three months ago, no one believed that it would be possible for the US Congress to enact comprehensive immigration reform any time soon.

February 1, 2013: Shifting Fortunes: Brazil and Mexico in a Transformed Region (PDF)
By Michael Shifter & Cameron Combs
Source: Current History
Just as Mexico has shown signs of an upswing, Brazil seems to be facing mounting difficulties.

February 1, 2013: Have Prospects for U.S.-Mexican Relations Improved?
By Peter Hakim, Andrés Rozental, and Laura Carlsen
Source: Latin America Advisor
With a new administration in Mexico sworn in last month and a renewed mandate for Obama this year, have the prospects for U.S.-Mexico relations improved? What is on the horizon for U.S.-Mexican relations, and how might they change from recent years?

January 24, 2013: The Rise of The Latin American Middle Class
By Allie Bobak
World Bank Latin American Chief Economist Augusto de la Torre and Senior Economist Julian Messina discussed the region’s rapidly expanding middle class and what it means for Latin America's future.

January 17, 2013: Policy Discussion and Book Launch: Illicit Commerce in the Americas
By Tim Heine
The Dialogue was please to host a policy discussion on illicit trafficking in the Western Hemisphere featuring Peter Andreas of Brown University’s Political Science Department and the Watson Institute for International Studies, Vanda Felbab-Brown of the Brookings Institution and Steven Dudley of InSight Crime and the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars.

January 15, 2013: Organized Crime and Insecurity in Belize (PDF)
By Julie López
In this working paper, López offers an in-depth look at the security landscape in Belize, a country too often ignored in regional policy discussions, but one which faces criminal challenges similar to those of its larger Central American neighbors.

January 11, 2013: Latin America’s Giants: Agreeing to Agree
By Peter Hakim
Source: Latin Pulse
Back in 2010, the Brazilian and Mexican presidents were right to think that they had a win-win proposition when they agreed to pursue a "special economic pact.” Although negotiations stalled that year, the shifting fortunes of the two countries may have improved prospects for agreement.

January 10, 2013: 5 LGBT Trends to Watch For in the Americas in 2013
By Javier Corrales and Cameron Combs
Source: The Huffington Post
There was a time when the most important developments in LGBT rights occurred in North Atlantic countries, but since the late 2000s all of the Americas, not just the United States and Canada, have begun to set trends. As we look to 2013, here are some of the trends to follow in the hemisphere's struggle for LGBT rights.

January 8, 2013: Which Issues Will Define the Brazil-Mexico Agenda?
By Peter Hakim, Rubens Barbosa, Ruben Olmos, Joel Korn
Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is planning to visit Mexico this year, likely in March, Reuters has reported. The two countries have been at odds in recent months over an automobile trade dispute, but there are some indications that trade relations may improve. What are the key issues that will define their bilateral agenda in the near term?

January 4, 2013: Peace Now? Mexican Security Policy after Felipe Calderón (PDF)
By Alejandro Hope
After giving an overview of President Felipe Calderón's security approach, Hope outlines how his successor, Enrique Peña Nieto, will likely proceed within a country whose security has been fundamentally altered over the past six years.

January 4, 2013: How Are Mexico's Drug Trafficking Organizations Changing?
By Marcelo Bergman, Eric L. Olson, Steven Dudley, Douglas Farah, and Raúl Benítez Manaut
Source: Latin America Advisor
A new report from the Mexican government estimates that there are as many as 80 small- and medium-sized drug cartels in operation. In the previous report, the administration of then-President Felipe Calderón said eight large cartels were at work in Mexico, though it added that at least one of them had splintered into smaller factions. How are the size, make-up and landscape of drug cartels changing? Are different populations, sectors or businesses likely to be affected by the violence in 2013? Are Peña Nieto's planned European-style gendarmeries likely to succeed in reducing violence and other crimes?

December 29, 2012: 2012: A Mixed Year for a Divided Latin America
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Faro
The multiple, cross cutting divisions among the countries of Latin America took several new turns this year.US election—unexpectedly—also turned out to be one of the most important events for the region in 2012.

December 26, 2012: The 2012 Gay Year in Review: The Top-20 Stories from the Americas
By Javier Corrales and Cameron Combs
Source: Americas Quarterly
In 2012 the Western Hemisphere continued to make headlines in terms of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) rights. Here is our list of the 20 most significant political stories on LGBT rights across the Americas.

November 29, 2012: A Discussion on Mexico's Education Challenges
By Claudia Vanegas
Claudio González and David Calderón, president and general director, respectively, of Mexicanos Primero, joined PREAL for a discussion of the education challenges confronting the incoming Peña Nieto administration.

November 27, 2012: Ahora, Obama puede atender más a la región
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Clarín
Casi sin aviso, temas que durante mucho tiempo figuraron en el orden del día entre Estados Unidos y América Latina reviven, ahora que Barack Obama encara su segundo mandato. La inmigración, Cuba, y las drogas siempre tuvieron una dosis excepcionalmente alta de política interna, y todavía la tienen, pero los resultados de las recientes elecciones estadounidenses indican que los obstáculos para el avance podrían estar cediendo.

November 27, 2012: Now, Obama Can Focus More on the Region
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Clarín
Almost without warning, issues that have long been on the agenda between the US and Latin America are alive again as Barack Obama looks to his second term. Immigration, Cuba, and drugs have always had an unusually high dose of domestic politics, and they still do, but results of the recent US elections suggest that obstacles to progress may be easing.

November 27, 2012: Sea Change in Spain
By Michael Shifter
Source: Foreign Policy
Latin America's economic growth and Europe's debt crisis have turned Ibero-American relations upside down.

November 26, 2012: Won't You Be My Neighbor?
By Peter Hakim
Source: Foreign Policy
When the leaders of Mexico and the United States meet for the first time, they'll have a chance to make real progress on issues that have been stalled for decades.

November 16, 2012: Where Is the Drug Policy Debate Headed Next?
By Ray Walser, Peter Hakim, Kimberly Covington, Andrés Rozental
Source: Latin America Advisor
Colorado and Washington state passed measures legalizing recreational marijuana in the United States' Nov. 6 election. Where does the debate about drug policy in the United States and in the region appear to be headed?

November 15, 2012: New U.S. Drug Laws Create 'Huge Problem' for Mexico: Ambassador
By Rachel Sadon
Source: Latin America Advisor
The legalization of recreational marijuana on ballot measures in Colorado and Washington last week present "a huge problem" for the Mexican government's effort to rally public support for the country's deadly war on drugs, Mexican Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan said Wednesday.

November 9, 2012: Is Freedom of the Press Under Threat in Latin America?
By Viviana Giacaman, Benoit Hervieu, and Scott Griffen
Source: Latin America Advisor
Press freedom has been in the headlines recently, as a Bolivian radio journalist was set on fire in a brutal attack last month, and Mexico's government in July said that 67 journalists have been killed and 14 disappeared in the country since 2006. Meanwhile, critics have charged that the press is under siege in Argentina, where the government passed a controversial law that will break up Grupo Clarín, a leading media conglomerate it considers an opponent. Is press freedom seriously jeopardized in these countries or elsewhere in the region? What implications does it have for the state of democracy? Should regional bodies or other organizations be taking action? If so, how?

November 8, 2012: What Will Obama's Second Term Mean for Latin America?
By Peter Hakim, Andrés Rozental, Rubens Barbosa, Riordan Roett, Ruben Olmos
Source: Latin America Advisor

November 8, 2012: 4 años más de gobierno Obama: ¿Más de lo mismo con América Latina?
By Michael Shifter
Source: Perspectiva
Yo creo que uno de los temas, que no es precisamente de política hacia América Latina, pero que está relacionado y es muy importante para la región, y en el que sí puede haber un cambio, es el tema migratorio.

November 5, 2012: Land of the Lost
By Michael Shifter
Source: Foreign Policy
Latin Americans may prefer Barack Obama over Mitt Romney, but few believe either candidate will pay the region the attention it deserves.

November 1, 2012: Elecciones en EEUU: no vienen cambios para AL
By Carlos F. Chamorro & Michael Shifter
La omisión de México en el último debate presidencial, entre Obama y Rommey sobre política exterior en Estados Unidos, le resulta inconcebible a Michael Shifter, director del Diálogo Interamericano, quien no espera cambios en las relaciones con América Latina, “tal vez únicamente en los matices y la retórica”, después de la reñida elección del seis de noviembre.

October 26, 2012: Will America Look South? US Policy in Latin America
By Michael Shifter
Source: Royal United Services Institute
In the final presidential debate, Latin Americans understandably took note when Governor Mitt Romney emphasised that the region represented a 'huge opportunity' for expanded trade with the United States. President Barack Obama's omission of Latin America in his list of regions where relations with the US had improved in the past several years set off a burst of tweets among Latin Americans.

October 25, 2012: What Would a Romney Victory Mean for Trade With the Region?
By Roger Noriega, Ted Piccone, Andrés Rozental, Stephen Johnson, Michael Allion
Source: Latin America Advisor
U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney said in his second debate with President Barack Obama that he would 'dramatically expand trade in Latin America' as part of his plan to improve the American economy. What would a Romney administration mean for economic relations with the region? Could he successfully forge new free-trade agreements with Latin America? How would a Romney victory alter the United States' relations with the region?

October 24, 2012: The Market for Money Transfers: Ranking of Remittance Service Providers in Latin America and the Caribbean (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
These results are based on research of nearly 50 remittance service providers working in the US to Latin America and Caribbean corridors. Of these, data was fully collected for 37 of them. These companies hold over 90% of flows to Latin America and the Caribbean.

October 22, 2012: Discordância Interamericana: Brasil e Estados Unidos
By Peter Hakim
Source: IPEA Boletim de Economia e Política Internacional
Mas o problema central para as relações Brasil-Estados Unidos não tem sido suas discordâncias, e sim a incapacidade de encontrar áreas de concerto. Uma relação melhor e mais produtiva entre Brasil e Estados Unidos exigirá que ambos identifiquem agendas e objetivos em que estejam dispostos a se comprometerem com cooperação sustentada de longo prazo. Por enquanto, eles parecem confortáveis com a manutenção do status quo em suas relações bilaterais.

October 5, 2012: Some Justified Optimism in Mexico
By Peter Hakim
Source: Latin Pulse
As Mexico approaches the December 1 inauguration of its new president Enrique Peña Nieto, things are looking up. Though there the new government will face substantial challenges, Mexicans have tangible grounds for optimism, particularly about progress on critical reforms.

October 1, 2012: Es muy difícil hablar ahora de la década de América Latina
By Michael Shifter
Michael Shifter habló con Portafolio sobre el panorama de la región, la desaceleración de la economía brasileña y el ascenso de México, las elecciones en Estados Unidos y Venezuela y el buen momento de Colombia.

September 18, 2012: Are Mexican Factories Gaining an Upper Hand Against China's?
By Andrés Rozental, Margaret Myers, James R. Jones, Felipe Canales
Source: Latin America Advisor
With the rising cost of wages in China, manufacturers are increasingly considering Mexico an attractive location to 'reshore' production, McClatchy reported Sept. 10. Is Mexico gaining a competitive edge over China in terms of manufacturing? Or will other low-wage countries come to replace both China and Mexico as manufacturing destinations? What are the challenges and benefits of moving production facilities to Mexico? Can Mexico leverage the low cost of wages into more sustainable growth?

August 27, 2012: The Impact of Taxes and Social Spending on Inequality and Poverty in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Mexico and Peru: A Synthesis of Results (PDF)
By Nora Lustig et al.
Source: Tulane Economic Working Paper Series
Nora Lustig's research team apply a standard tax and benefi t incidence analysis to estimate the impact on inequality and poverty of direct taxes, indirect taxes and subsidies, and social spending (cash and food transfers and in-kind transfers in education and health).

August 20, 2012: US-Mexico Commission
By Kimberly Covington
On August 20, the Inter-American Dialogue held a meeting of its US-Mexico Commission, which discussed how to improve bilateral cooperation on key areas such as trade, immigration, and security.

August 1, 2012: Latin America's Energy Future (PDF)
By Roger Tissot
Roger Tissot, energy analyst and member of the Dialogue's Energy Policy Group, examines trends in Latin America’s energy matrix over the last 40 years, and highlights the issues facing the region’s governments as they attempt to balance energy costs, security of supply, and environmental sustainability.

July 26, 2012: Mexico's Next Sexenio: What Lies Ahead?
By Julia Yansura
On July 26, the Inter-American Dialogue hosted a conversation on what to expect from Mexico’s incoming presidential administration, which will take office on December 1, 2012.

July 25, 2012: The Future of US-Mexico Cooperation
By Jacob Weisenthal
On July 25, the Inter-American Dialogue held a private roundtable discussion on the the future of US-Mexico cooperation with distinguished members of Congress, officials from the Obama administration, and Washington area policy analysts.

July 16, 2012: Declining Inequality in Latin America in the 2000s: The Cases of Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico (PDF)
By Nora Lustig, Luis F. Lopez-Calva and Eduardo Ortiz-Juarez
Source: Tulane Economic Working Paper Series
Between 2000 and 2010, the Gini coefficient declined in 13 of 17 Latin American countries. The decline was statistically significant and robust to changes in the time interval, inequality measures and data sources. In depth country studies for Argentina, Brazil and Mexico suggest two main phenomena underlie this trend: a fall in the premium to skilled labor and more progressive government transfers.

June 28, 2012: A Campaign About Nothing
By Michael Shifter
Source: Foreign Policy
On July 1, some 80 million Mexican voters will turn their backs on the drama and turbulence that has recently beset their country as they select a new president for the next six years. The electorate will choose among three main candidates whose statements and policy positions have been notably cautious -- and who have been strikingly vague about what they would change in how the country is handling its most serious problems.

June 21, 2012: Police Reform in Mexico: The Challenge of Institutional Change
By Julia Yansura
On June 21, the Inter-American Dialogue held a discussion on police reform in Mexico, featuring Daniel Sabet, author of the new book Police Reform in Mexico: Informal Politics and the Challenge of Institutional Change. The session was co-sponsored by the Inter-American Dialogue and the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

June 20, 2012: What Will Be Accomplished at This Week's Rio+20 Summit?
By Juan José Daboub, Mark Konold, and Jim Shultz
Source: Latin America Advisor
Hundreds of world leaders and government officials have converged in Rio de Janeiro at the Rio+20 Earth Summit, which begins today. United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said that the conference must achieve 'concrete decisions and agreements,' though some are skeptical that a global consensus on plans to combat climate change is likely to occur. Is Rio+20 likely to result in an actionable, common agenda? Or will the agreement be 'so weak it is meaningless, or completely collapse,' as WWF director general Jim Leape predicted? What is Latin America's role in the global debate over climate change? How well are its cities and states preparing for climate change?

May 29, 2012: What Awaits Mexico if the PRI Sweeps the July 1 Elections?
By Andrés Rozental, James R. Jones, Andrew Selee, and George W. Grayson
Source: Latin America Advisor
The Institutional Revolutionary Party, with its allied Green Party, is poised to win a majority of the seats in both houses of Mexico's Congress in national elections this July, according to a poll released May 11 by Consulta Mitofsky. PRI presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto has been running more than 20 percentage points ahead of competitors Andrés Manuel López Obrador of the PRD and Josefina Vázquez Mota of the ruling PAN party in recent polls. What types of legislative changes or reforms would result from PRI control of Mexico's presidency and both chambers of its Congress? Will the PRI re-establish the dominance that it enjoyed for seven decades? Can the PAN and PRD regroup, or will new parties and alliances form should the PRI sweep the election?

May 11, 2012: Citizen Security in Latin America
By Alexis Arthur
Gino Costa, former Minister of the Interior in Peru and President of Lima-based think tank Ciudad Nuestra, presented the findings of a recent Dialogue paper, "Citizen Security in Latin America”. Costa’s rigorous analysis highlights five critically important indicators of citizen security in the region: homicide; victimization; perceptions of insecurity; confidence in the police; and the prison system. Steven Dudley, Co-Director of InSight Crime, provided commentary on Costa's remarks.

May 10, 2012: How Important Is the Supreme Court Case on Immigration?
By Jim Kolbe, Anthony Romero, Jessica Zuckerman, Louis DeSipio, Tamar Jacoby
Source: Latin America Advisor
In late June, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on the federal government's challenge to Arizona's controversial immigration law, which requires local police officers to check the immigration status of anyone suspected of being in the country illegally. During oral arguments April 25, justices were skeptical of the Obama administration's arguments that Arizona overstepped its authority. How strong is the federal government's case? How might the outcome affect immigration policies and the future immigration debate? Will the high court's decision influence the U.S. presidential election in November? What are the case's implications, if any, on the economies of the United States, Mexico and Central American countries?

May 1, 2012: Tendencias Futuras de las Remesas en América Latina y el Caribe (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
Las remesas familiares aumentaran 8% entre 2010 y 2011, casi alcanzando niveles previos a la recesión de 2007, según un informe recién publicado por el Diálogo InterAmericano. “Futuras Tendencias en Remesas a Latinoamérica y el Caribe,” por Manuel Orozco, asociado principal en el Diálogo, analiza cambios en la frecuencia y la cantidad de envíos de dinero usando datos y encuestas de los últimos diez anos.

May 1, 2012: Is Bribery Just a Cost of Doing Business in Mexico?
By Andrés Rozental, Jon French, Tapen Sinha, John A. Detzner, and Ruben Olmos
Source: Latin America Advisor
Executives of Wal-Mart de México allegedly bribed officials with more than $24 million over the past several years to speed up expansion in Mexico, The New York Times reported April 21. According to the report, the retailer failed to notify law enforcement of the evidence its investigators had uncovered, instead shutting down the internal probe. The retailer said it is aggressively investigating the allegations. What do the allegations say about the state of doing business in Mexico? Is bribery a widespread cost of doing business in the country? Are Mexican laws and other regulations, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, proving to be inadequate?

April 27, 2012: Journalists at Risk in Central America: What Can Be Done?
By Rachel Schwartz
On April 27, the Dialogue hosted a conversation on risks to journalists in Central America, featuring three of the region's top journalists: Carlos Dada of El Salvador, Julie López of Guatemala, and Carlos Fernando Chamorro of Nicaragua.

April 25, 2012: A Conversation with Santiago Levy on the IDB’s 2012 Macroeconomic Report
By Alexandra Solano
IDB Vice President Santiago Levy presented the findings of the 2012 Macroeconomic Report, "The World of Forking Paths: Latin America and the Caribbean Facing Global Economic Risks," speaking at the Dialogue on April 25. The report identifies the region's critical vulnerabilities and how it can prepare for external shocks that could emerge.

April 24, 2012: Education Chapter in Mexico 2042 (PDF)
By Jeffrey Puryear, Lucrecia Santibañez and Alexandra Solano

April 24, 2012: Education Chapter in Mexico 2042 (PDF)
By Jeffrey Puryear, Lucrecia Santibañez and Alexandra Solano

April 24, 2012: U.S. Should Not Increase Spending on Border Security: Report
By Rachel Sadon
Source: Latin America Advisor
Calls for increasing U.S. forces and spending along the border with Mexico don't reflect the reality of the security situation and should not be heeded, a report released on Thursday concluded.

April 13, 2012: Congressional Staff Roundtable: Countering Criminal Violence in Central America
By Rachel Schwartz
On April 13, the Council on Foreign Relations hosted a roundtable discussion with Dialogue president Michael Shifter in the US Capitol building to exchange ideas with Congressional staff members on his new report Countering Criminal Violence in Central America, commissioned and published by the Council’s Center for Preventive Action. The high-level group of over 30 staff members explored a range of topics relating to Central America’s precarious security situation—from emerging trends in drug trafficking and organized crime violence to the efficacy of the current US response.

April 12, 2012: Cartagena, ¿una Cumbre memorable?
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
La discusión anticipada de varios de los temas más controvertidos -incluyendo el rol de Cuba en los asuntos regionales, las alternativas a las actuales estrategias antidrogas, el reclamo de Argentina sobrelas Islas Malvinas/Falkland Islands-podría hacer que esta Cumbre sea particularmente trascendental, o podría resultar, simplemente caliente y polémica.

April 12, 2012: A Consequential Summit?
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
The anticipated discussion of two of the hemisphere’s most controversial issues—Cuba’s role in regional affairs and alternatives to current anti-drug strategies—could make this Summit particularly consequential, or it could simply lead to a heated and contentious exchange.

April 11, 2012: Remaking the Relationship: The United States and Latin America (PDF)
By Inter-American Dialogue
The United States and Latin America, after a decade of profound change, are increasingly going their separate ways. Without a rethinking of the relationship and resolution of three stubborn, long-standing problems—immigration, Cuba, and drug policy—the drift and distancing are likely to continue, potentially producing new tensions and risks for hemispheric affairs. The report also points to several critical opportunities that would lead to more productive cooperation and help establish the necessary basis for sustained partnership between the United States and Latin America.

April 11, 2012: Remaking the Relationship: The United States and Latin America
By Amber Hodgen
The Inter-American Dialogue held a roundtable discussion on April 11 to formally release its recently completed policy report, Remaking the Relationship: The United States and Latin America. Dialogue president Michael Shifter was joined by Dialogue co-chair and CEO of Hills & Company Carla Hills, Dialogue member and senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Moisés Naím, and Dialogue president emeritus Peter Hakim.

April 10, 2012: Drug Policy at the Summit of the Americas
By Luis Ferreira
The Colombian government has announced that drug policy will be on the agenda for discussion among the heads of state at the Summit of the Americas at the end of this week. A panel of drug policy experts will gather at the Dialogue to suggest specific areas that the assembled leaders should focus on when considering alternative drug control policies, and what recommendations they would most like to emerge from the Summit.

April 9, 2012: Drugs: The Debate Goes Mainstream
By Fernando H. Cardoso, César Gaviria, Ernesto Zedillo
Source: Huffington Post
Latin America is talking about drugs like never before. The taboo that has long prevented open debate about drug policies has been broken -- thanks to a steadily deteriorating situation on the ground and the courageous stand taken by presidents Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia, Otto Perez Molina of Guatemala and Laura Chinchilla of Costa Rica.

April 9, 2012: Countering Criminal Violence in Central America (PDF)
By Michael Shifter
This report, published by the Council on Foreign Relations' Center for Preventive Action, explores the causes and consequences of the violence faced by Central American countries and examines the national, regional, and international efforts aimed at reducing its worst effects. It identifies US interests involved in the deteriorating situation and offers policymakers a set of key recommendations to enhance regional cooperation and be more effective in tackling shared security challenges.

April 8, 2012: El debate impensable está hoy sobre la mesa
By Fernando H. Cardoso, César Gaviria, Ernesto Zedillo
Source: El Tiempo
¿Cuál es la mejor manera de enfrentar el problema de las drogas? Diferentes opciones están puestas hoy sobre la mesa. En los últimos cuatro meses, la discusión ha avanzado más que en 40 años. Lo que parecía impensable está ahora siendo discutido a la luz del día.

April 4, 2012: Balance on the Border? Evaluating US News Media Portrayals of Mexico (PDF)
By Michael Shifter and Rachel Schwartz
Source: Temas
Over the past decade, Mexico has emerged as a major flash point in the US news cycle. Yet, this high level of interest has been accompanied by increasingly unfavorable views toward the United States’ southern neighbor. According to a February 2011 Gallup poll, US attitudes toward Mexico are the most negative they have been in over 20 years. These negative attitudes are no doubt connected to two factors: Mexico’s violent struggle against drug trafficking and the significant flow of Mexican migrants into the United States. These developments have at once placed Mexico at the top of the US news cycle, while also generating rising levels of ill will among the US populace. The situation raises concerns and questions about the connection between US media coverage and public perceptions of Mexico. What is the nature and quality of US news reporting on Mexico?

April 4, 2012: ¿Equilibrio en la frontera? México en los medios de comunicación norteamericanos (PDF)
By Michael Shifter and Rachel Schwartz
Source: Temas
Durante la última década, México ha surgido como un punto de gran envergadura en el ciclo noticioso norteamericano. A pesar de estar involucrada en dos guerras en el Medio Oriente, y de la creciente competencia de naciones como China, la atención norteamericana no se ha desviado totalmente de sus más próximos vecinos. El público norteamericano sigue preocu pado sobre el estado de los asuntos en México. Un sondeo de febrero de 2011 arrojó que 62% de los que respondieron estaban «muy interesados» o «algo interesados» por lo que ocurre en México,1 con lo que ocupa un puesto equivalente al de otros puntos neurálgicos globales como Iraq, Afganistán, Corea del Norte, Irán, Pakistán y el Egipto posterior a la revolución.

April 3, 2012: A New Vision for Mexico 2042: Achieving Prosperity for All (PDF)
By Alexandra Solano
Where will Mexico be in 2042? According to the authors of a new study, Mexico will be trailing behind emerging countries if much needed reforms are not implemented now.

April 3, 2012: Is Mexico's Middle Class Fundamentally Changing the Country?
By Andrés Rozental, Nicolás Mariscal, Rogelio Ramírez de la O, and Richard Feinberg
"The rise of the Mexican middle class is the most relevant development of the last decade in the country," a new report from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars states. Mexican society has fundamentally changed, as citizens have acquired stronger senses of property and ownership and demand more accountability from authorities, the report added. Do you agree? What opportunities and challenges would a growing Mexican middle class bring to businesses in Mexico? For governments? Would a stronger middle class change Mexico's political calculus?

March 19, 2012: The Mexican Elections and the Future of Social Democracy in Mexico
By Alexandra Solano
The Inter-American Dialogue and Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a discussion with Jesús Zambrano Grijalva, current president of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, Mexico’s largest party of the left. He began his political career in his home state of Sonora as a student leader and ultimately become one of the PRD’s founding members. He later served in Mexico’s Chamber of Deputies and held numerous leadership positions in Mexico City’s government during the administration of Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Mr. Zambrano will speak on Mexico’s upcoming national election and the impact it will have on Mexican society.

March 15, 2012: The Cartagena Summit: Agenda, Challenges, and Expectations
By Luis Ferreira
The Inter-American Dialogue hosted a discussion on the upcoming Summit of the Americas, which will take place in Cartagena, Colombia on April 14 to 15. Our featured guests included Ambassador Jaime Girón, the Summit Coordinator for the Colombian Government; John Feeley, the Summit coordinator for the US State Department; Sherry Tross, the Summit Secretary for the OAS and Harriet Babbitt, former U.S. Ambassador to the OAS and Deputy Administrator of USAID. The session focused on the proposed agenda for discussion among the assembled heads of state and on the expected outcomes of their deliberations. We will also examine some of the key challenges that Summit participants are likely to confront in the course of their two day meeting.

March 13, 2012: El lugar para hablar de drogas
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Espectador
Dentro de América Latina está creciendo el consenso de que la raíz de la violenta ola de criminalidad que se extiende por varios países se debe al uso masivo de narcóticos en Estados Unidos Los EE.UU. han demostrado a lo largo de los años que no quieren o no pueden frenar su demanda o frenar el flujo de dinero o armas a las bandas criminales. Sin embargo, la ansiedad de Washington sobre discutir la política de drogas con los líderes del hemisferio que se reunirán en Cartagena son exageradas.

March 13, 2012: The Right Place for a Drug Policy Debate
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Espectador
Among Latin Americas, there is a growing consensus that the root cause of their violent crime wave is the massive use of narcotics in the US. And there is not much question that it is mostly the US’s unceasing demand for drugs and the huge profits it generates that finances organized crime across the region, particularly in Mexico and Central America. Nonetheless, Washington’s anxieties about discussing drug policy with hemispheric leaders in Cartagena are exaggerated.

March 9, 2012: PREAL's 2011 Program Highlights (PDF)
By PREAL
The close of 2011 marked another successful year of activities designed to improve the quality and equity of education in Latin America and the Caribbean. PREAL organized dozens of events, published documents on subjects ranging from the PISA results to teacher evaluations in Mexico, and kicked off formal projects with three multinational organizations. Our recently completed document, "2011 Program Highlights," provides descriptions of a sampling of PREAL’s activities during the year, with a particular emphasis on publications, events, and education report cards.

March 7, 2012: Demystifying the Chinese Economy
By Alexis Arthur
We are pleased to announce a conversation with World Bank Chief Economist Justin Lin about his just-released book Demystifying the Chinese Economy to be held at the Inter-American Dialogue. Mr. Lin has served at the Bank for the past four years. Previously he was the Founding Director and Professor of the China Center for Economic Research (CCER) at Peking University. Carnegie Senior Associate and former director of Foreign Policy Magazine Moisés Naím will participate in the exchange.

March 1, 2012: What's at Stake for Businesses in Mexico's Presidential Election?
By Nicolás Mariscal, Andrew Selee, James R. Jones, and Rogelio Ramírez de la O
Source: Latin America Advisor
Josefina Vázquez Mota, the candidate of Mexico's ruling National Action Party, or PAN, and the first female major-party nominee for president in Mexico's history, is rising in the polls ahead of the country's July presidential election. Vázquez Mota had 32 percent support (eliminating undecided voters) in a poll released Feb. 20 by El Universal and polling firm Buendia & Laredo. The poll showed that Vázquez Mota is still trailing Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, by 16 percentage points. Will Vázquez Mota's support continue rising until election day? How similar is Peña Nieto's PRI from the party that lost Mexico's presidency in 2000 after holding it for more than seven decades? What is at stake for Mexico's business community in the election?

February 23, 2012: A Conversation on the UNODC 2011 Global Study on Homicides: A Private Roundtable with Angela Me, Chief of Statistics for the UN Drugs and Crime Office (UNODC)
By Kim Covington
The second roundtable meeting in a series on citizen security in the Americas sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank and the Inter-American Dialogue hosted Angela Me, Chief of Statistics for the UN Office on Drugs and Crime. Dr. Me presented the 2011 Global Study on Homicide, and participants engaged in a wide ranging discussion of the report's implications for Latin America and the Caribbean.

February 15, 2012: Gang Violence and Security in Central America: A Conversation with Tom Bruneau
By Daniela de Gonzalez-Arguelles
A discussion with Naval Postgraduate School professor Tom Bruneau to launch his latest book Maras: Gang Violence and Security in Central America (University of Texas Press).

February 10, 2012: Initiative on Security and Migration in Central America and Mexico: Second Meeting, Guatemala
By Rachel Schwartz
On February 10 and 11, the Inter-American Dialogue hosted the second meeting of its initiative on security and migration in Central America and Mexico, in conjunction with the Asociación de Investigación y Estudios Sociales (ASIES) and La Red Centroamericana de Centros de Pensamiento e Incidencia.

February 10, 2012: Initiative on Security and Migration in Central America and Mexico: Second Meeting, Guatemala
By Rachel Schwartz
On February 10 and 11, the Inter-American Dialogue hosted the second meeting of its initiative on security and migration in Central America and Mexico, in conjunction with the Asociación de Investigación y Estudios Sociales (ASIES) and La Red Centroamericana de Centros de Pensamiento e Incidencia.

January 30, 2012: The Debate the GOP Didn't Have in Florida
By Michael Shifter
Source: Foreign Policy
One can be forgiven for assuming that a primary election in Florida -- a state with a huge Latino population, often touted as the gateway to Latin America -- would offer the best time and place to have a serious debate about how the United States should deal with its closest neighbors, its proverbial "backyard." But that would be ignoring past experience and today's political realities.

January 30, 2012: The Rise and Fall of Income Inequality in Mexico, 1989 - 2010 (PDF)
By Raymundo Campos, Gerardo Esquivel, and Nora Lustig
Inequality in Mexico rose between 1989 and 1994 and declined between 1994 and 2010. Raymundo Campos, Gerardo Esquivel, and Nora Lustig examine the role of market forces (demand and supply of labour by skill), institutional factors (minimum wages and unionization rate), and public policy (cash transfers) in explaining changes in inequality.

January 12, 2012: Mexico Making Strides in Fight Against Cartels: Public Security Secretary
By Rachel Sadon
Source: Latin America Advisor
Despite the pervasiveness of grisly headlines, Mexican security forces are nonetheless making gains in the fight against organized crime, the country's secretary for public security, Genaro García Luna, said Wednesday.

January 12, 2012: Qué se espera de la Cumbre de las Américas
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
En abril, en Cartagena, Colombia, la Cumbre de las Américas juntará a los 34 presidentes electos y primeros ministros. Hay ciertamente varias razones para el optimismo en la Cumbre de Cartagena. Pero está claro que el éxito de esta Cumbre tendrá que depender de el liderazgo y la creatividad de Colombia y de otros gobiernos regionales.

January 12, 2012: The Next Summit of the Americas: A Preview of Cartagena, Colombia
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
In April, in Cartagena, Colombia, the Summit of the Americas will bring together the hemisphere’s 34 elected presidents and prime ministers. There are certainly reasons for optimism about the Cartagena Summit. But it is clear that the success of this Summit will depend on the leadership and creativity of Colombia and other Latin American and Caribbean countries.

January 8, 2012: En Cuba la Iglesia puede ser un actor en cualquier cambio
By Michael Shifter
El papa Benedicto XVI visitará la isla caribeña en marzo próximo y eso, a juicio de un analista estadounidense, es reflejo de que la Iglesia es la institución cubana mejor posicionada en una eventual transición que ocurriera.

January 3, 2012: Un año con alta dosis electoral
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
En 2012, tres elecciones presidenciales -México, Venezuela y los Estados Unidos- podría alterar el mapa político y las relaciones en las Américas.

January 3, 2012: A year with a high dose of elections
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Colombiano
In 2012, three presidential elections – in Mexico, Venezuela, and the United States -- could alter the political map and relations in the Americas. The economy and – in Mexico and Venezuela, security – are decisive, as are the quality of the candidates and campaigns. There could well be surprises.

December 19, 2011: The Global Economic Crisis: Impact on Poverty in Latin America
By Kim Covington
The Inter-American Dialogue hosted a discussion with the World Bank Poverty Reduction and Gender Group Sector Manager for Latin America and the Caribbean, Louise Cord, on the impact of the global crisis on poverty and inequality in Latin America. Two questions guided the discussion—why poverty has continued to decline despite the crisis and what now has to be done to avoid losing ground to the economic uncertainty and slowdown in much of the region.Commentary was provided by Judith Morrison, the Inter-American Development Bank’s senior advisor for the Gender and Diversity Unit, and Jeffrey Puryear, vice president for Social Policy at the Inter-American Dialogue.

December 14, 2011: Will CELAC Succeed Where Other Similar Efforts Have Failed?
By Andrés Rozental, Peter Hakim, Alxander Main, Susan Kaufman Purcell, Sally Shelton-Colby
Thirty-three nations of the Western Hemisphere-excluding the United States and Canada-launched the new Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, or CELAC for its initials in Spanish, on Dec. 2. Why did so many of the region's countries sign on to CELAC, when other multilateral and intraregional organizations exist? What stands in the way of its goals, and why might it succeed where other integration efforts have faltered? How will CELAC differ from the Washington-based Organization of American States, and will CELAC siphon money and resources away from the OAS over time?

December 14, 2011: ¿Tendrá éxito la CELAC dónde otros similares han fallado?
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
Los países de América Latina tenían diferentes razones para promover la CELAC.Teniendo en cuenta la disminución de la relevancia de Washington en los asuntos regionales, los beneficios para América Latina de una organización política de toda la región con Estados Unidos como miembro están disminuyendo. Sin embargo, sólo los más cercanos aliados de Venezuela en el grupo del Alba pidieron que la CELAC reemplace a la OEA. A pesar de todo, la mayoría de los gobiernos de América Latina todavía quieren a los Estados Unidos bajo el mismo techo.

December 14, 2011: Will CELAC Succeed Where Other Similar Efforts Have Failed?
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
Latin American countries had different reasons for promoting CELAC. Brazil was most responsible for CELAC. It was at Brazil's 'megasummit' in 2009, where an already expanded Rio Group was essentially renamed CELAC-and Lula was able to show the reach, influence and leadership of Brazil.

December 7, 2011: Mexico's Foreign Policy: The Issues and Choices Ahead
By Christian Reyes
The Inter-American Dialogue with the Woodrow Wilson Center held a discussion of Mexico’s foreign policy challenges. Our featured guest was Mexican scholar Rafael Fernández de Castro, who served as foreign policy adviser to President Calderón. Dr. Fernández de Castro reviewed the most important issues and choices confronting Mexico in its relations with the US as both countries prepare for presidential elections next year. He also examined the prospects and potential risks of Mexico’s taking on a larger foreign policy role in Central and South America—and discussed the global opportunities and challenges facing Mexico. Andrew Selee, director of the Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute, provided commentary.

December 6, 2011: Global Trends and the Future of Latin America
By Luis Ferreira
On December 6, 2011, the Dialogue organized a one-day workshop at the Inter-American Development Bank.

November 28, 2011: Is the Transpacific Trade Partnership Initiative on Track?
By Patrick Kilbride, Todd Tucker, Justin S. Miller, Jorge Heine, and Richard Feinberg
U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk announced this month that Canada and Mexico have joined Japan in expressing interest in participating in the Transpacific Trade Partnership (TPP), an investment and trade initiative that the Obama administration considers a "top priority" in its Asia-Pacific strategy. Is the TPP on track to complete a framework in 2012, as planned, or will the recent interest from Canada, Mexico and Japan delay the timetable? Are Mexico and Canada likely to join the TPP, and what changes would they bring?

November 22, 2011: Will the PRI Return to Mexico's Presidency Next Year?
By Rogelio Ramírez de la O, Andrés Rozental, and George W. Grayson
Mexico's opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) on Nov. 13 won back the governorship of Michoacán state with the victory of Fausto Vallejo Figueroa over Luisa María Calderón, the candidate of the National Action Party (PAN) and sister of President Felipe Calderón. The result in Michoacán, the president's home state, was seen as a sign of weariness with the PAN amid the country's brutal drug war. Does the Michoacán election portend a return of the PRI to the presidency next year? How will economic conditions in Mexico, which is forecast to grow between 3.5 and 4 percent this year, affect the election? Is Mexico perceived as a good place to do business or has the drug war significantly affected investment?

November 21, 2011: Workshop on US Drug Policy
By Kim Covington
As part of its work on drug policy, the Dialogue hosted a meeting a high-level officials and analysts on November 21 to tackle the question, "What is US drug policy?" Participants sifted through the varied views of US drug policy, engaging in a wide ranging discussion to piece together a clear view of what that policy is today.

November 15, 2011: Cato Insitute Conference: Ending the Global War on Drugs
By Kim Covington
Fernando Henrique Cardoso gave the closing address at the Cato Institute conference, "Ending the Global War on Drugs" on November 15, calling for a new global drug regime that focuses on reducing the harms of drug use rather than pursuing a "war on drugs." President Emeritus, Peter Hakim, also spoke on the effect of drug trafficking and violence on Central America.

October 31, 2011: Replantear la política antidroga de EE UU
By Peter Hakim
Source: Política Exterior
Nadie está satisfecho con las políticas de combate a las drogas aplicadas por EE UU en los últimos 40 años. Pese a que la mayoría de los estadounidenses cree que la ‘guerra contra las drogas’ ha fracasado, el debate en Washington permanece prácticamente mudo.

October 31, 2011: Rethinking US Drug Policy
By Peter Hakim
Source: Política Exterior
No one is satisfied with the United States’ anti-drug policies today. Despite the fact that a majority of US citizens now believe that their forty-year “war on drugs” has failed, there is hardly any debate at all in Washington over the US approach to illicit drugs.

October 28, 2011: Central America – the Politics of Electric Integration
By Kim Covington
On Friday, October 28, the Inter-American Dialogue hosted a discussion with Guatemala's vice minister of energy, Minor Lopez; Teofilo de la Torre, the president of Costa Rica’s national electricity company; Carlos Trujillo of the Inter-American Development Bank and Jeremy Martin of the Institute of the Americas on the outstanding issues that remain for Central American electric integration and the region's other critical energy challenges.

October 21, 2011: A Conversation with Josefina Vázquez Mota
By Alexandra Solano
According to Josefina Vázquez Mota, leading primary candidate for Mexico’s Partido Acción Nacional (PAN), the next nine months are not only going to shape the next six years in Mexico, but the rest of the 21st century.

October 14, 2011: The Mexican Diaspora Investment Partnership (PDF)
By Christian Reyes
The Dialogue hosted a discussion on the role of the Mexican diaspora in fostering investment and public-private partnerships in Mexico.

October 1, 2011: Poverty, Inequality and the Millennium Development Goals in Latin America and the Caribbean
By Nora Lustig
Evidence shows that poverty and inequality have dropped sharply in most of Latin America and the Caribbean in the past decade. Progress, however, is not uniform across the region, which remains impoverished and unequal with many education and health deficiencies. This paper will highlight progress and specific challenges in making progress toward the Millennium Development Goals, and recommend action to reduce poverty and inequality and promote education and health.

September 24, 2011: Pobreza, desigualdad y Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio en América Latina y el Caribe
By Nora Lustig
Tal como lo demuestran una serie de documentos oficiales y publicaciones académicas recientes, la región en su conjunto ha experimentado una reducción significativa de la indigencia, la pobreza y la desigualdad en la distribución del ingreso durante la década pasada. Asimismo, ha habido indudable progreso en materia de acceso a educación, salud e infraestructura básica así como en los indicadores de nutrición y salud. La región en su conjunto avanza a ritmo adecuado para el cumplimiento de un buen número de las metas planteadas en los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio.Sin embargo, amén de que el grado de progreso es heterogéneo y hay países claramente rezagados donde las metas probablemente no se cumplan. En este documento no se intentará hacer un análisis exhaustivo de todo lo pendiente en la agenda social sino de poner énfasis en algunos aspectos que requieren particular atención.

September 23, 2011: Construyendo la Seguridad Ciudadana en las Américas
By Peter Hakim con Kim Covington
La seguridad pública es el problema que más preocupa actualmente a los ciudadanos de casi todos los países de América Latina y el Caribe. De acuerdo a los datos obtenidos mediante de estudios de opinión, alrededor del 27% de la población de la región identificó la delincuencia como el mayor problema que debió enfrentar su país en 2010, por sobre cualquier otro problema, incluyendo la economía y el desempleo, que por largo tiempo fueron las preocupaciones dominantes. La delincuencia y la seguridad pública fueron identificadas como el principal problema en 11 de los 18 países encuestados.

September 16, 2011: Reassessing China-Mexico Competition
By Margaret Myers
China’s rise has presented numerous challenges for Mexican industry. Yet despite tough competition, Mexico’s manufacturing sector may be experiencing a resurgence – its current share of US imports is the highest in nearly a decade.

September 8, 2011: How Is the Immigration Debate Changing in the United States?
By Dan Stein, Doris Meissner, and Louis DeSipio
Last month, U.S. President Barack Obama announced a new immigration policy that allows authorities to use prosecutorial discretion in determining deportations, allowing "many undocumented immigrants without criminal records to stay in the United States." The announcement comes on the heels of protests targeting the Secure Communities program, which activists argue was being used improperly to deport minor offenders. Meanwhile, new reports indicate that illegal immigration has declined significantly over the past several years. How is the immigration debate changing in the United States and what does the new policy mean for that debate? How is it likely to play out in the presidential race? What will be the economic consequences of a decline in immigration?

August 25, 2011: What Roles Are Women Playing in Mexico's Drug War?
By Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Howard Campbell, Elaine Carey, and Elena Azaola
The number of women imprisoned for federal crimes in Mexico has soared by 400 percent since 2007, bringing the total number of women in prison past 10,000, The New York Times reported Aug. 13. What roles are women playing in the country's brutal drug trafficking war? How has their involvement changed in recent years? Is the increase merely a symptom of cartels' infiltration into Mexican life or are other factors contributing to the rise in women incarcerated for federal crimes?

August 4, 2011: Measuring Up? (PDF)
By Alejandro J. Ganimian and Alexandra Solano Rocha
This document presents a brief analysis of how Latin America and the Caribbean countries performed on the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA)–an achievement test administered by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) every three years since 2000 that assesses what 15-year-olds know and can do in reading, math and science.

August 4, 2011: ¿Estan al nivel? (PDF)
By Alejandro J. Ganimian y Alexandra Solano Rocha
Este documento presenta un breve análisis del desempeño de América Latina y el Caribe en el Programa de Evaluación de Estudiantes (PISA) del 2009–una prueba global de rendimiento estudiantil administrada por la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico (OCDE) cada tres años desde el 2000 que evalúa las habilidades de los jóvenes de 15 años en lectura, matemática y ciencias.

July 13, 2011: Violence, Crime, and Citizen Security in Central America and Mexico
By William Merrow
The Congressional Members Working Group (CMWG) convened on July 14, 2011 for a dinner discussion on violence, crime, and citizen security in Central America and Mexico.

June 27, 2011: A Conversation on Crime and Security in Central America
By Kimberly Covington
Central America faces its most severe security crisis in decades. The key to success lies in regional cooperation said Eduardo Stein, former vice president of Guatemala and director of a network of Central American think tanks known as La Red Centroamericana de Centros de Pensamiento e Incidencia (LaRed).

June 23, 2011: Why Haven't Brazil, Argentina and Chile Backed Carstens?
By Peter Hakim, Markus Jaeger, John Williamson, Riordan Roett
Source: Latin America Advisor
Agustín Carstens, Mexico's respected central bank governor and a former finance minister, has won support from Spain and 13 Latin American countries in his bid to succeed Dominique Strauss-Kahn as the head of the International Monetary Fund. Argentina, Brazil and Chile stand out, however, for not yet endorsing Carstens, who has made the case that emerging economies and Latin America, in particular, should play a stronger role in global affairs. Why are Brazil, Argentina and Chile holding out? Are they likely working together? What does the situation indicate about leadership in the region and Latin America's role in world affairs? Do you think Carstens should get the job?

April 12, 2011: Official: Funding Issues Critical to U.S. Security Programs
By Rachel Sadon
Focusing on transnational crime is a top priority of the Obama administration's policy in Latin America, but the government has found mixed successes and questions loom about future funding for critical programs, a senior State Department official said Monday.

April 6, 2011: Mexico: How Far Have its Institutions Really Come?
By Claudio Loser
Mexico just celebrated the 17th anniversary of its accession to the OECD and, earlier, the ratification of NAFTA. During this period, Mexico has made significant progress in many areas, notably its remarkable macroeconomic management and continued improvements in addressing inequality. Still, the question remains if Mexico has achieved a degree of institutional development consistent with its participation in those organizations

April 4, 2011: Una región sin rugir de sables
By Michael Shifter
Source: Portafolio
Según Michael Shifter, la democracia se ha consolidado en América Latina, aunque es cada día más variada.

March 14, 2011: Panorama antes del viaje del presidente de EE.UU. por América Latina: “Obama se dirige al Sur”
By Peter Hakim
Source: Infolatam
No hay un tema u objetivo principal que domine la visita del Presidente Obama a América Latina esta semana. En cada sitio seguirá una agenda distinta con diferentes objetivos.

March 8, 2011: Latin America 2040: Breaking Away from Complacency
By Alexa Millinger
The Inter-American Dialogue hosted a discussion focused on a longer-term vision for Latin America as developed in the recently published "Latin America 2040 – Breaking Away from Complacency: An Agenda for Resurgence" (Sage Publications, 2010). The session took place on Tuesday, March 8 at the Inter-American Dialogue.

March 6, 2011: Repensando la política de drogas de EE.UU.
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Espectador
Hace más de cuatro décadas los gobiernos americanos están embarcados en una “guerra contra las drogas” concebida por EE.UU. La evidencia disponible sugiere que esta política es muy costosa, no ha logrado sus objetivos, y podría estar causando más violencia de la que se propone evitar. Que se haya mantenido tanto tiempo, sin ninguna modificación fundamental, se debe en parte a imposición inflexible de Washington.

March 1, 2011: Peter Hakim: "La estrategia de lucha contra las drogas no está funcionando"
By Daniel Pacheco con Peter Hakim
Source: Su Voz Cuenta
Hay que poner todo sobre la mesa. En EE.UU. la prohibición ha sido sumamente dañina, en número de jóvenes en las cárceles, vidas interrumpidas.

February 18, 2011: PREAL 2010 Program Highlights (PDF)
By PREAL
A summary review of PREAL's activities in 2010.

February 11, 2011: Hay razones para ser optimista sobre el futuro de América Latina
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Tiempo
Hay buenas razones para ser optimista sobre el estado de la democracia en América Latina hoy. Las encuestas recientes del Latinobarómetro y el barómetro de las Américas apuntan a niveles más altos de apoyo a sistemas democráticos de gobierno. La política y las opciones electorales se han estrechado. Una política más consensual, más centrista se ha afianzado cada vez más.

February 11, 2011: Reasons to Be Optimistic About Latin America's Future
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Tiempo

February 11, 2011: Will Latin America Win the Economic Future?
By Alexis Arthur
Latin American economies are recovering at different rates in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, according to Nicolás Eyzaguirre, director of the Western Hemisphere Department at the IMF. Eyzaguirre warned that promising growth rates in Latin America might have obscured a more complex reality. A summary of his analysis follows.

January 21, 2011: Discussing the 2010 AmericasBarometer Survey: "Democratic Consolidation in the Americas During Hard Times"
By Danielle Nesmith
The Inter-American Dialogue hosted a breakfast discussion about the findings of the 2010 AmericasBarometer Survey, “Political Culture of Democracy, 2010 – Democratic Consolidation in the Americas During Hard Times,” featuring LAPOP director Mitchell Seligson and associate director Elizabeth Zechmeister on January 21, 2011.

January 14, 2011: A Surge to the Center
By Michael Shifter
Source: Journal of Democracy
Latin America, long associated with sharp ideological swings and notably erratic politics, is increasingly settling into the middle of the left-right political continuum. This development is discernible in voter attitudes and major policy directions in many countries.

December 22, 2010: What Does 2011 Hold for Latin American Economies?
By Luis Oganes, Roger Scher, Santiago Maggi
The United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, or ECLAC, announced Dec. 13 that it expects Latin America and the Caribbean will have experienced 6 percent economic growth in 2010 and will see growth of 4.2 percent in 2011. Which countries will grow most in the year ahead and which will lag behind? Which sectors in the region will see significant growth in 2011 and which will struggle? Why?

November 17, 2010: EVENT: Rising Oil Prices Benefit Central America and the Dominican Republic
By Daphne Morrison
Energy economist Jeff Rubin explained that the financial crisis caused a serious dip in global oil prices. As American consumers tightened their belts, demand for oil plunged, dragging the price down with it. This pattern was only exacerbated as the crisis globalized. Since cheap oil prices tend to favor countries with cheap labor, China weathered the economic storm with remarkable strength—in large part because American consumers were buying up Chinese goods. Today, as the global market crawls out of the crisis and oil prices recover, the CAM-DR countries are making a come-back. For these countries, proximity to the United States, their largest trading partner, is in itself a competitive advantage over Asia. This is because, in the words of Rubin, “distance costs money.”

November 8, 2010: What Do the U.S. Election Results Mean for Latin America?
By Jim Kolbe, Andres Rozental, James R. Jones, Jason Hafemeister
In the U.S. midterm elections Nov. 2, Republicans won control of the House of Representatives and picked up seats in the Democrat-controlled Senate, which President Barack Obama called a 'shellacking' for Democrats. What do the election results mean for hemispheric policy and foreign relations? How will the Republican victories affect immigration, trade, and other issues that are relevant to Latin America?

August 20, 2010: Fiscal Policy and the Poor in Latin America (PDF)
By Jeffrey Puryear and Mariellen Malloy Jewers
The brief summarizes recent research on the impact of fiscal policy on poverty and inequality in Latin America. It compares Europe, where fiscal policy significantly reduces inequality, to Latin America, where fiscal policy has almost no impact on inequality. The brief concludes that the combination of inadequate revenues, low-quality services and poorly targeted spending helps explain the limited role that fiscal policy has played. It is the third in a series of policy briefs that will target key issues on the region’s social agenda.

August 20, 2010: La política fiscal y los pobres en América Latina (PDF)
By Jeffrey Puryear y Mariellen Malloy Jewers
La síntesis resume la más reciente investigación sobre el impacto de la política fiscal en la pobreza y desigualdad en América Latina. Dicha síntesis compara a Europa, donde la política fiscal reduce significativamente la desigualdad, con América Latina, donde la política fiscal casi no tiene impacto en la desigualdad. La síntesis concluye que la combinación de ingresos inadecuados, servicios de baja calidad y mala focalización del gasto ayuda explicar el papel limitado que ha tenido la política fiscal. Es la tercera dentro de una serie de síntesis de política social enfocada en temas claves en la agenda social de la región.

June 30, 2010: Hay un retroceso democrático claro en Nicaragua
By Interview with Michael Shifter
Source: Confidencial
Desde sus oficinas en Washington D.C, Michael Shifter, Presidente del Diálogo Interamericano, --uno de los principales centros de análisis sobre las relaciones entre Estados Unidos y América Latina-- señala que entre demócratas y republicanos existe preocupación por la forma que el Presidente Daniel Ortega gobierna el país. “No hay confianza en el Consejo Supremo Electoral, ni una ruta fácil para enfrentar los problemas políticos en Nicaragua”, advierte Shifter. Mientras tanto, en la OEA se debate la necesidad de flexibilizar los mecanismos para acceder a la Carta Democrática Interamericana.

June 18, 2010: A Scorecard in the Market for Money Transfers: Trends in Competition in Latin America and the Caribbean (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco, Elisabeth Burgess and Landen Romei
This report presents a review of remittance markets from the United States to 15 selected Latin America and Caribbean countries. It finds competition among remittance service providers (RSPs) relatively strong, with lower costs, high consumer satisfaction, and payout networks spanning over 50,000 payment points across the region.

June 18, 2010: Remittances Scorecard for Latin America and the Caribbean
By Matthew Schewel
Growing competition among companies that offer remittance transfers to Latin America has helped lower transaction costs for migrants living in the United States, according to a new study by the Inter-American Dialogue.

June 15, 2010: What Was Accomplished at Last Week's OAS Meeting?
By John F. Maisto, Vicki Gass, Diego Arria, Abraham F. Lowenthal
Foreign ministers from across the Western Hemisphere, including U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, gathered June 6-8 in Lima for the annual General Assembly of the Organization of American States. What was accomplished at the meeting?

June 14, 2010: Declining Inequality in Latin America: A Decade of Progress? (PDF)
By Nora Lustig and Luis F. López-Calva (Eds)
Latin America is always singled out because of its high and persistent income inequality. However, after a period of rising inequality, towards the end of the 1990s Latin America’s concentration of income began to fall. Of the seventeen countries for which comparable data is available, twelve experienced a decline since 2000 in particular. Through in-depth analyses of Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Peru, this book is among the first attempts to understand why inequality has fallen in Latin America since 2000.

May 20, 2010: U.S. Could Lose Trade Edge in Asia, Latin America: Experts
By Matthew Schewel
The United States needs to take on a leadership role in global trade diplomacy or risk losing its ability to compete in Asian and Latin American markets, experts said at a recent panel discussion co-hosted by the Inter-American Dialogue and the Chilean-American Chamber of Commerce.

May 18, 2010: Latin America's Growing Equality: Myth or Reality?
By Jeffrey Puryear
It's worth noting that inequality has declined recently in much of Latin America. But are these decreases part of a long-term trend? Has Latin America found an effective and sustainable strategy for reducing inequality?

April 30, 2010: Skilled Diasporas: an imagined or real community? (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco and Mariellen Jewers
This paper provides a roadmap to understand the issues that shape what is referred to as skilled diasporas and their practices with development. The analysis problematizes the idea of the skilled diasporas as agents of knowledge transfer and offers practical policy strategies to link these groups to possible knowledge transfer mechanisms as development tool. We argue that these skilled diasporas or migrant transnational communities are relatively small groups, constituting less than 20% of a migrant population whose skills may not be necessarily in correspondence with the development needs of home countries. To that effect, practical policy considerations are important to keep in place.

April 28, 2010: Ex-Im Bank On Track to Double Latin America Financing This Year
By Matthew Schewel
The Export-Import Bank of the United States is on track to double its financing of U.S. exports to Latin America this year as part of President Barack Obama's ambitious plan to increase the country's exports twofold by 2015, the bank's head said Tuesday.

April 21, 2010: How Could U.S. Financial Reform Affect Money Transfer Companies?
By Manuel Orozco, Annette LoVoi, Paul Dwyer and Tom Haider
A draft version of the Restoring American Financial Stability Act proposed by U.S. Sen. Christopher Dodd (D.-Conn.) contains an amendment that would directly impact the money transfer industry, including requirements that companies regularly disclose and post exchange rates. How would the bill in its current form affect remittance providers?

April 16, 2010: La verdadera historia de Cancún
By Peter Hakim
Source: América Economía
Con un acuerdo de Brasil y México firmado, casi todos los países de América Latina estarían vinculados a través de la red existente de acuerdos económicos y comerciales. Brasil ataría a México a sus socios del Mercosur Argentina, Paraguay y Uruguay, mientras que México traería Brasil más cerca de sus socios del TLCAN, los EE.UU. y Canadá. TLCAN y el Mercosur son dos grupos de países que hasta ahora han sido incapaces de construir lazos productivos comerciales. Una sólida relación económica de Brasil y México podría convertirse en la piedra angular de un nuevo intento de forjar un acuerdo comercial a nivel hemisférico para sustituir a las negociaciones en curso sin esperanzas para el Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA).

April 16, 2010: The Media Missed the Real Story in Cancún
By Peter Hakim
Source: América Economía
While the media was busy covering the creation of a new Latin American group that excludes the U.S. and Canada, Mexico and Brazil were busy working toward a bilateral trade agreement. There is still much work ahead, but if signed the agreement would reshape the trade and economic realities of the hemisphere.

March 3, 2010: Violence and Impunity: Protecting Journalists in Colombia and Mexico (PDF)
By Inter-American Dialogue
In 2008 the Dialogue convened two private conferences, one in Colombia and one in Mexico, designed to develop a greater sense of urgency about crimes against journalists; strengthen communication between the media and government officials charged with defending journalists; and devise a set of recommendations regarding the investigation and prosecution of violence against journalists. This report is the product of those two meetings.

March 3, 2010: Violencia e Impunidad: Cómo Proteger a los Periodistas en Colombia y México (PDF)
By Inter-American Dialogue
En el año 2008 se realizaron dos encuentros privados, uno en Colombia y otro en México, orientados a imprimir mayor urgencia al tratamiento de los delitos en contra del periodismo, a fortalecer la comunicación entre medios y autoridades encargadas de la defensa de los periodistas, y a proponer un conjunto de recomendaciones respecto de la investigación y persecución de hechos de violencia contra la prensa.

February 25, 2010: Head of Mexican Banking Association Sees Rebound in Loan Growth
By Matthew Schewel
The head of Mexico's banking association said Wednesday he expects loan growth to top 10 percent this year as the country pulls out of its worst recession in over a decade. Mortgages and loans to small businesses are poised to grow more than 15 and 20 percent respectively.

February 18, 2010: Protecting Latin America’s Poor During Economic Crises (PDF)
By Nora Lustig
History tells us that economic crises cause large increases in poverty and slow down or reverse progress in key social indicators. Even when governments try to protect the poor, they often lack the institutional capacity to do so quickly and effectively. The brief describes how past economic crises have affected poverty, education and health in Latin America, and suggests a pro-poor policy response in three areas: the macroeconomic policy mix, the composition of fiscal adjustments and social safety nets. It is the second in a series of policy briefs that will target key issues on the region’s social agenda.

February 18, 2010: ¿Cómo se puede proteger a la población pobre durante las crisis económicas? Lecciones del pasado. (PDF)
By Nora Lustig
La crisis económica global que comenzó a finales de 2007 ha tenido su repercusión en América Latina. La síntesis ilustra cómo las crisis económicas han afectado la pobreza, la educación y la salud. Aún cuando los gobiernos quisieran proteger a los pobres del impacto de las medidas de austeridad, a menudo carecen de la capacidad institucional para hacerlo de manera rápida y efectiva. En conclusión, se presenta una serie de recomendaciones para que los gobiernos protejan a la población pobre durante los periodos de crisis económica. Es la segunda dentro de una serie de síntesis de política social enfocando en temas claves para la agenda social de la región.

February 15, 2010: PREAL 2009 Program Highlights (PDF)
By PREAL
A summary overview of PREAL's work in 2009.

February 3, 2010: Region's Economic Outlook Depends Increasingly on China, Brazil
By Dialogue staff
Latin America and the Caribbean—a region made up of more than 20 nations—increasingly finds its economic outlook tied to the fate of two countries, Brazil and China, Wall Street analysts told an audience at the Inter-American Dialogue Wednesday.

February 1, 2010: Obama y América Latina: Nuevos Comienzos, Viejas Fricciones
By Michael Shifter
Source: Revista Política Colombiana

January 20, 2010: A Disappointing First Year: Obama and Latin America
By Peter Hakim
Source: FOREIGN AFFAIRS LATINOAMÉRICA
Inter-American relations have taken a disappointing course for the Obama Administration. The US has suffered several political setbacks in the region since the Trinidad Summit and little progress has been made on most of the “legacy” issues that Obama inherited from Bush and other predecessors.

January 20, 2010: Un decepcionante primer año: Obama y Latinoamérica
By Peter Hakim
Source: FOREIGN AFFAIRS LATINOAMÉRICA
Barack Obama generó un cambio palpable en el ambiente de las relaciones entre Estados Unidos y Latinoamérica durante la 5ª Cumbre de las Américas de 2009. Sin embargo, las relaciones interamericanas desde entonces han tomado un curso decepcionante. Estados Unidos ha pasado por varios contratiempos políticos en la región y se ha hecho poco progreso en la mayoría de los temas del “legado” que Obama heredó de George W. Bush y de otros predecesores.

January 15, 2010: Vulnerabilidad y remesas en el sector rural Mexicano (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
Análisis de la Encuesta sobre Vulnerabilidad de las familias rurales realizada por la Asociación Mexicana de Uniones de Crédito del Sector Social A.C. en el 2008

January 7, 2010: El difícil año de Obama en América Latina
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Universal (Mexico)
2009 no fue un buen año para las relaciones Estados Unidos-América Latina. La agenda de Obama para 2010 ante América Latina tampoco será fácil.

January 7, 2010: The Obama Administration: A Difficult Year in Latin America
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Universal (Mexico)
2009 has not been a good year for U.S.-Latin America relations. Obama’s Latin American agenda will not be any easier in 2010.

January 5, 2010: VIDEO: The Financial Crisis and Latin America: A Conversation With Augusto de la Torre
By Chris Moore
Source: www.thedialogue.org
The Dialogue sat down with Augusto de la Torre, Chief Economist for Latin America and the Caribbean at the World Bank, to take stock of the financial crisis which rocked the global economy in 2008 and 2009, and to consider what prospects for recovery lie ahead. The Dialogue's president, Peter Hakim, also comments.

January 1, 2010: Twelve Myths in the Fight Against Drug-trafficking
By Joaquín Villalobos
Source: Nexos
Mexico has not seen violence levels with such political and social impact since the Revolution of 1910. The intricacy to understand public information and results related to the fight against drug-trafficking and organized crime implemented by the Mexican Government, has resulted in the emergence of a series of myths and fallacies surrounding the violence derived from the so-called “war against drug-trafficking.”

December 28, 2009: VIDEO: A Conversation With Peter Hakim
By Chris Moore
Source: www.thedialogue.org
As 2009 comes to a close, the Dialogue sat down with Peter Hakim to review the significant events of the year and forecast challenges that might lay ahead. This is the interview with Peter Hakim in its entirety.

December 28, 2009: VIDEO: Year In Review: 2009
By Chris Moore
Source: www.thedialogue.org
As 2009 comes to a close, the Dialogue sat down with staff, including Peter Hakim, Michael Shifter, Dan Erikson, Jeff Puryear, and visiting fellow Aurea Molto, to review the significant events of the year and forecast challenges that might lay ahead.

December 24, 2009: What Issues Will Drive U.S.-Latin American Relations Next Year?
By Peter Hakim
Source: Latin America Advisor
According to a Gallup Poll conducted last summer, Latin Americans' perceptions of U.S. leadership improved dramatically this year as President Barack Obama took office. Despite general public goodwill, however, the Obama administration has faced sharp criticism over the handling of the coup in Honduras and a military agreement between the United States and Colombia that alienated some countries in South America. What issues will drive U.S.-Latin American relations in the coming year? Where should the Obama administration focus its efforts in Latin America and the Caribbean?

December 9, 2009: Congressional Working Group Meets to Discuss Drug Policy in the Americas
By Daphne Morrison
The Dialogue’s Congressional Members Working Group convened on December 9 for a dinner discussion on drug policy in the Americas, hosted by Representative Gregory Meeks (D-NY). Representatives Jared Polis (D-CO), Jean Schmidt (R-OH) and Eliot Engel (D-NY) were joined by former Swiss President Ruth Dreifuss, former Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Colombian Ambassador to the White House Carolina Barco, Mexican Ambassador to the White House Arturo Sarukhan, and Corporación Andina de Fomento President Enrique Garcia, among other participants.

December 1, 2009: ¿Cuánto están aprendiendo los niños en América Latina? Datos destacados del Segundo Estudio Regional Comparativo y Explicativo (SERCE) (PDF)
By PREAL (Alejandro Ganimian)
El documento resume los resultados principales del SERCE, el estudio de UNESCO que evaluó el rendimiento académico de los estudiantes en el tercer y sexto grados en matemáticas, lectura y ciencias en 16 países de América Latina. Compara los países participantes en términos del rendimiento promedio; estudiantes con alto y bajo rendimiento; y diferencias en su rendimiento por sexo, zona de residencia, y PIB per capita.

October 27, 2009: How Poor and Unequal is Latin America and the Caribbean? (PDF)
By Jeffrey Puryear and Mariellen Malloy Jewers
The brief draws on a rich array of sources to identify a set of basic facts about of poverty and inequality in Latin America. It describes the region’s extraordinary concentration of income at the top of the income scale, and its absence at the bottom—setting Latin America apart from every other region of the developing world. The brief concludes that, despite modest recent progress, Latin America remains far from finding an effective strategy for reducing poverty and inequality. It is the first in a series of policy briefs that will target key issues on the region’s social agenda.

October 27, 2009: Pobreza y Desigualdad en América Latina (PDF)
By Jeffrey Puryear and Mariellen Malloy Jewers
La síntesis está sustentada en una amplia gama de información para aclarar lo que sabemos sobre la pobreza y la desigualdad en América Latina. Esta síntesis describe la extraordinaria concentración de ingreso en el sector de la población con mayor renta y su ausencia en el sector de la población más pobre – a diferencia de las demás regiones en desarrollo. La síntesis concluye que, a pesar del modesto progreso visto recientemente, América Latina no parece haber desarrollado una estrategia sólida para reducir la pobreza y la desigualdad. Ésta es la primera dentro de una serie de síntesis de política social enfocada en temas claves para la agenda social de la región.

October 16, 2009: House Subcommittee Advances Legislation For Review of Drug Policy
By Matthew Schewel
A group of US lawmakers is calling for a re-examination of America's decades-old "war on drugs," which since 1980 has cost taxpayers at least $14 billion through anti-narcotics efforts in Latin America and the Caribbean

October 1, 2009: Remittances and Social Development: The Latin American Experience (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
Source: Financing Social Policy: Mobilizing Resources for Development
Manuel Orozco's chapter in Financing Social Policy, edited by Katja Hujo and Shea McClanahan, presents a direct and systematic discussion that leaves few questions regarding 'what the data say' about remittances and their potential use for social development in Latin America.

September 29, 2009: The Outlook for Regional Competitiveness in Latin America and the Caribbean
By Sarah Farnan
On Tuesday, September 29th, the Inter-American Dialogue co-sponsored a discussion on the Outlook for Regional Competitiveness in Latin America and the Caribbean at Georgetown University. The meeting focused on two key questions that countries of Latin America and the Caribbean must face: How are they to manage regional competitiveness during times of economic uncertainty? And what is the current economic outlook for the hemisphere?

September 8, 2009: Another Chance for U.S. Policy in the Americas (PDF)
By Peter Hakim
Source: U.S. Naval War College
The election of Barack Obama was enthusiastically welcomed throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. The choice of an African American leader committed to universal values revealed the vitality of U.S. democracy to many in the region who had become skeptical. By their spirited reaction to the new president, Latin Americans have made clear that they want a better relationship with the United States, but they also want Washington to approach the region differently.

September 1, 2009: How Much Are Latin American Children Learning?: Highlights from the Second Regional Student Achievement Test (SERCE) (PDF)
By PREAL (Alejandro Ganimian)
The document summarizes the principal findings of SERCE, the UNESCO study that evaluated the skills of third and sixth graders in math, reading and science in 16 Latin American countries. It compares the participating countries in terms of average scores; high and low achieving students; and differences in performance by gender, place of residence and GDP per capita.

August 18, 2009: Fiscal Reform a Politically Thorny Issue in Mexico, Analysts Say
By Matthew Schewel
The Mexican economy is in the midst of its worst crisis in more than a decade, but political obstacles including a rejuvenated opposition in Mexico's Congress could complicate attempts by President Felipe Calderon to enact much-needed fiscal reforms, analysts said Tuesday.

August 12, 2009: U.S. Investigates Purchase of Petroleum Products from Mexico
By Interview with Matthew Schewel
Source: Clean Skies TV,
The US and Mexican government has been investigating the purchase of millions of dollars worth of petroleum products by US companies, officials say were stolen from Mexican oil company Pemex.

July 27, 2009: Inequality in Latin America: Grounds for Optimism?
By Alexandra Solano
Latin America is the most unequal region in the world. Yet, inequality has declined recently. Whether recent progress can be sustained was the topic at the Inter American Dialogue’s breakfast meeting on Monday, July 27th. Distinguished economist Dr. Nora Lustig, Samuel Z. Stone Professor of Latin American Economics in the Department of Economics at Tulane University and non-resident fellow of the Center for Global Development presented the results and analysis in a forthcoming book based on a UNDP-sponsored project, The New Dynamics of Inequality in Latin America, (Brookings Institution), co-edited by Luis Felipe Lopez-Calva. Renowned political economist Dr. Francis Fukuyama, Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy at Johns Hopkins’ Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies provided comments.

June 25, 2009: The Economy's Effects on the Ballot Box in Argentina, Mexico
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
Argentina and Mexico will have congressional elections over the next several days. Both countries have been hit by the international economic crisis, and have serious political and social ills that do not bode well for the incumbent parties—the rightist PAN in Mexico, and the populist-leftist Kirchner wing of the Peronist movement in Argentina.

June 23, 2009: Managing the US-Mexico Relationship
By Mariandrea Chamorro
The Inter-American Dialogue hosted a small, select group to participate in a seminar on coordination and logistics in the complex U.S.-Mexico bilateral relationship on Tuesday, June 23. Tonatiuh Guillén, President of the Colegio de la Frontera Norte, and John Bailey, Professor of Government and Foreign Service at Georgetown University, summarized some of their findings about continuity and change in process management.

June 9, 2009: Members of Congress Discuss Security Challenges Facing Guatemala
By Sara Lynch
A Congressional Members Working Group dinner discussion

June 1, 2009: How Much Danger Does Mexico Face in This Turbulent Time?
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
Mexican Finance Minister Agustin Carstens recently announced that gross domestic product will decline by more than 5 percent in 2009. Only a few weeks ago, in a recent paper on the subject, I suggested that GDP might decline by up to 3 percent. The worsening performance of the Mexican economy is a matter of concern even as the International Monetary Fund is providing the most significant support package granted in recent times and rating agencies have not yet modified Mexico's rating.

May 27, 2009: Access to Information in the Americas
By Alexandra Solano
On Wednesday, May 27th, the Dialogue held a discussion on recent developments in access to information in the Americas, including how institutions are working to create a new culture of transparency that can help limit government abuses.

May 26, 2009: Challenges for Mexican Democracy with Beatriz Paredes
By Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Beatriz Paredes spoke at a meeting jointly organized by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Inter-American Dialogue. Andrew Selee, director of the Mexico Institute, and Peter Hakim, president of the Dialogue, provided commentary.

May 26, 2009: VIDEO: Drugs and Violence: Part One of a Series on Mexico
By Chris Moore
The Inter-American Dialogue is pleased to release a recently-produced video on issues related to drugs and violence in Mexico. The video features commentary from Lázaro Cárdenas and Michael Shifter. It is the first in a series of videos to be released on Mexico.

May 13, 2009: Mexico: A safe vessel or a risky wreck in turbulent waters? (PDF)
By Claudio Loser
Mexico: A safe vessel or a risky wreck in turbulent waters? (May 2009) examines Mexico’s economic conditions with emphasis on its financial system and corporate sector. The report aims to raise questions on Mexican corporates’ ability to refinance themselves in the international marketplace and the related issue of the credit ratings agencies’ accuracy to price in Mexico’s sovereign and corporate risk.

April 23, 2009: How Much of the G-20's Gift Will Go to Latin America?
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
Not much has been written about the amounts of money Latin America and the Caribbean can expect to get. The answer to this is both positive and negative. The region's prospects for financing seem good, but the money will be available over several years, and will not fully offset the loss of private flows. The region could have the potential to obtain $180 billion in loans, or about 5 percent of the region's GDP.

April 23, 2009: Obama and Chávez: Energy Partners?
By Daniel P. Erikson and Paul J. Wander
Source: Journal of Energy Security
The US and Venezuela are likely to remain embroiled in an unfriendly but effective partnership based on strong northward trade flows of oil and other resources and southward flows of hard currency in the short term. While both sides have complained that the other is not the ideal trading partner, pragmatism trumped political rhetoric during the Bush administration, and Obama is unlikely to be much different in this regard. Still, competition for Latin America’s energy supplies will undoubtedly intensify at a time when many nations are seeking to exercise greater control over their oil and gas reserves. US policymakers need to be vigilant and proactive. The long-term outlook for US energy security will improve if they can fashion a compelling response to the new dynamic created by America’s falling economic power and Latin America’s resurgent nationalism. As with all previous US and Venezuelan administrations before them, Obama and Chavez are fated to be energy partners.

April 17, 2009: 'Obama está dispuesto a hablar con sus adversarios'
By Interview with Michael Shifter
Habrá un cambio con respecto a la administración de Bush. Obama es un presidente pragmático dispuesto a hablar con sus adversarios y a buscar maneras de cooperar. Pero no se puede esperar muchas políticas concretas muy drásticas, eso no sería realista.

April 17, 2009: From the G20 to the Summit of the Americas
By Chris Moore
The Inter-American Dialogue produced a video on the transition from the G20 Meeting in London to the Summit of the Americas.

April 14, 2009: Press Roundtable: Obama's Trip to Mexico and the Summit of the Americas
By Daphne Morrison
Sidney Weintraub of the Center for Strategic and International Studies joined the Dialogue’s Claudio Loser, Michael Shifter, Dan Erikson and Peter Hakim for a press roundtable discussion on the Summit and Obama’s trip to Mexico on Tuesday, April 14.

April 1, 2009: Hometown Associations: Transnationalism, Philanthropy, and Development (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco and Eugenia García-Zanello
Source: Brown Journal of World Affairs
Transnational migration and globalization have transformed the relationship between individuals and their surrounding communities, particularly between migrants, their homelands, and their host countries. In the context of this new transnationalism, new players have emerged, expanding the scope of international interaction. One such player is the hometown association (HTA) formed by immigrants seeking to support their places of origin, maintain relationships with local communities, and retain a sense of community as they adjust to life in their new home countries.

March 31, 2009: Members of Congress Discuss US-Mexico Relations
By Christina Lara
A Congressional Members Working Group Dinner Discussion

March 28, 2009: El narco en la agenda bilateral
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Universal
México atrajo la atención de la administración Obama, aunque no de la manera en que a muchas personas les habría gustado. En las próximas semanas, el presidente Obama y tres miembros de su gabinete —Hillary Clinton, Eric Holder y Janet Napolitano— visitarán el Distrito Federal. Todos ellos tienen como objetivo primordial decidir qué hacer respecto del implacable aumento de la violencia y la delincuencia en nuestro vecino del sur y al tráfico masivo de drogas y armas que la promueven.

March 28, 2009: Violent Mexico
By Peter Hakim
Source: El Universal
In the next few weeks, President Obama and three US cabinet secretaries—Hillary Clinton, Eric Holder, and Janet Napolitano—will be paying visits Mexico City. All of them have the central purpose of figuring out what to do about the relentless surge of crime and violence now confronting our Southern neighbor, and the massive drug and arms trafficking that fuels it. The focus is correct. Besides the devastating impact on Mexico, this exceptionally brutal crime wave threatens the US in myriad ways. But, when they sit down with their Mexican counterparts, the US leaders must be clear about what it will take to restore law and order to Mexico.

March 23, 2009: A Second Chance: U.S. Policy in the Americas (video)
By Chris Moore
The Inter-American Dialogue produced a video on the report "A Second Chance: U.S. Policy in the Americas," and its recommendations for a new U.S. policy agenda in the Americas.

March 11, 2009: Más que caminos trillados
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: Encuentro en la Red
Con una relación estratégica, ambos países se beneficiarían de un proceso de consulta y cooperación. Aunque pocos países son tan importantes para Estados Unidos como lo es México, es muy poco probable que atraiga toda la atención del gobierno de Obama.

March 11, 2009: The Summit of the Americas: A New Beginning for US Policy in the Region (PDF)
By Peter Hakim
Testimony presented before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs at the hearing entitled, “The Summit of the Americas: A New Beginning for U.S. Policy in the Region?” on March 10, 2009.

March 1, 2009: Efectividad del desempeño docente. Una reseña de la literatura internacional y su relevancia para mejorar la educación en América Latina. (PDF)
By PREAL (Barbara Hunt)
El documento contiene una reseña de la literatura internacional reciente sobre los temas relacionados con la efectividad docente. La primera sección presenta una definición operativa de la “efectividad docente”. Sigue un panorama general de las necesidades educativas, de la situación de los docentes y de su formación en los países latinoamericanos. La tercera sección destaca distintos abordajes para definir y medir la efectividad docente, mientras que la cuarta reseña lo que dice la literatura sobre cómo mejorar la efectividad docente. La quinta sección lleva al contexto latinoamericano los hallazgos de la literatura internacional en estas materias. El documento concluye con una propuesta de definición de efectividad docente.

February 26, 2009: Mexico's progress in U.S. interest
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
While few countries are as important to the United States, Mexico is unlikely to get the Obama administration's undivided attention.

February 4, 2009: US, Mexico Must Expand Efforts to Fight Human Trafficking
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable and Landen Romei
Source: Latin America Advisor
According to the International Labor Organization, there are 12.3 million people in forced labor and sexual servitude around the world. However, other non-profit organizations estimate that the number is closer to 27 million and growing, especially in Latin America. Since the passage of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) in 2000, the United States has dedicated millions of dollars to protect victims of contemporary slavery worldwide.

February 1, 2009: No Longer Washington's Backyard (PDF)
By Michael Shifter and Dan Joyce
Source: Current History
As Brazil’s mega-summit in December made clear, nations in a transformed region are demanding treatment befitting serious countries with global interests and ambitions.

January 7, 2009: Foreign Direct Investment Expected to Weaken This Year
By Alicia Bárcena
Source: Latin America Advisor
Despite the current global economic downturn, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Latin American and the Caribbean (LAC) for 2008 is expected to surpass the 100 billion mark for the second consecutive year.

January 4, 2009: “El narcotráfico demandará de Obama atención política de alto nivel” (PDF)
By Interview with Michael Shifter
Source: La Prensa Gráfica El Salvador
Este analista del Interamerican Dialogue de Washington cree que el enfoque de Obama en la guerra contra las drogas debe ir más allá del apoyo financiero a programas tradicionales. Pide creatividad e innovación.

January 1, 2009: Obama & Latin America: Magic or Realism? (PDF)
By Daniel P. Erikson
Source: World Policy Journal
While it is too early to know if the presidency of Barack Obama will lead to an important restructuring of inter-American relations, there is little question that the potential for momentous change is in the air. If the Obama presidency follows the pattern of its predecessors, the early warm glow of good feelings will soon give way to a pragmatic understanding on both sides of the relationship regarding the possibilities and limits of what the United States and Latin America can expect of the other.

December 24, 2008: Latin America Faces 'Remarkable Deceleration' in Growth
By Alfredo Coutino
Source: Latin America Advisor
Latin America has shown a strong resilience to the international crisis. During 2008 the region's performance did not show major signs of deceleration. In fact, in the first half of the year, the region performed at a speed similar to that of one year before.

December 22, 2008: Del american dream a la crisis financiera global (PDF)
By Nora Lustig y Jorge Mariscal
Source: Nexos (Mexico)
La mañana del 17 de julio de 2007 los mercados financieros norteamericanos se despertaron con la noticia de que dos de los fondos administrados por Bear Sterns, uno de los bancos de inversión más grandes de los Estados Unidos, estaban en serios problemas a causa de sus inversiones en instrumentos financieros basados en deudas hipotecarias “subprime” o de baja calidad crediticia. Esta fue una de las primeras señales de las dificultades enfrentadas por esta compañía, que ocho meses después sería rematada a JP Morgan, y por el resto del sistema financiero global, que poco más de un año después se encontraba en la peor crisis desde la Gran Depresión.

December 18, 2008: United States has "unique window of opportunity" to help Mexico
By Chloe Brown
According to Pamela Starr of the University of Southern California, “Mexico won’t leap forward in the next few years, but it won’t free fall either…. Mexico is unlikely to generate the jobs needed to encourage growth or mitigate migration flows, and the security challenge is likely to get worse before it gets better.” Starr presented the major conclusions of her upcoming Pacific Council for International Relations report on Calderon's first two years in office during a discussion at the Inter-American Dialogue that focused on near-term security and economic challenges for the bilateral U.S.-Mexico relationship. Andrew Selee of the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and Eduardo Zepeda of the Carnegie Endowment and UNDP also contributed to the panel.

November 25, 2008: Financial Crisis and the Poor: What Should Governments Do?
By Mariellen Jewers
The Dialogue held a breakfast discussion on how the economic slowdown will affect the poverty and inequality, and what Latin American governments should do to minimize the negative impact on the poor. Ariel Fiszbein, Chief Economist for the Human Development Network at the World Bank and Suzanne Duryea, a Senior Economist at the Inter-American Development Bank presented; Nora Lustig, Shapiro Visiting Professor of international affairs at George Washington University, offered comments.

November 24, 2008: Reform in Mexico Forces Debate on Sale of Teaching Positions
By Jeffrey Puryear
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
Teaching positions are for sale in Mexico, and have been for decades. Although seldom discussed, the practice—established by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) to reward party loyalists—is apparently widespread. The going price for a teaching position in a public primary school is reported to be between $5,000 and $12,000, depending on locale. Teachers who resign can either sell their positions or pass them on to their children. In at least some cases, local governments and the teachers' union supervise the buying and selling process.

November 21, 2008: LATIN AMERICA/US: Obama may mark attitude shift
By Michael Shifter
Source: Oxford Analytica
Obama's election has generated enormous goodwill and enthusiasm in the region, as in the rest of the world. Although many Latin Americans are expecting change from Washington, most understand that Obama and Congress will be consumed by other urgent priorities.

November 20, 2008: Tasting Identity: Trends in Migrant Demand for Home-Country Goods, Micronote (PDF)
By USAID
This report is a study on the demand for nostalgic goods and the ways in which local ethnic stores support that demand. The study is the first of its kind and is based on a nationwide survey of 1300 individuals from twelve nationalities and interviews with nearly fifty ethnic stores supplying home country goods to migrant populations. The results of the study show that migrants manifest a solid demand that looks for quality and product selection, and relies on a network of stores and importers to satisfy those needs. This demand reflects realities of community building, identity and transnational links. Moreover, the presence of ethnic stores operating across inner city neighborhoods emerge as the interface of global economic links, connecting identity with necessity by selling those products demanded by migrants.

November 20, 2008: Tasting Identity: Trends in Migrant Demand for Home-Country Goods, Summary (PDF)
By USAID
This report is a study on the demand for nostalgic goods and the ways in which local ethnic stores support that demand. The study is the first of its kind and is based on a nationwide survey of 1300 individuals from twelve nationalities and interviews with nearly fifty ethnic stores supplying home country goods to migrant populations. The results of the study show that migrants manifest a solid demand that looks for quality and product selection, and relies on a network of stores and importers to satisfy those needs. This demand reflects realities of community building, identity and transnational links. Moreover, the presence of ethnic stores operating across inner city neighborhoods emerge as the interface of global economic links, connecting identity with necessity by selling those products demanded by migrants.

November 13, 2008: Fox Warns of Isolationism During Times of Economic Crisis
By Matthew Schewel
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
Former Mexican President Vicente Fox on Tuesday warned against repeating what he said was a crucial mistake of the Great Depression—closing off markets during an economic crisis in an effort to create domestic jobs. Fox, who served as president from 2000 to 2006, has publicly questioned President-elect Barack Obama's views on trade. In an interview with the Latin America Advisor, the former President said any attempt to return to the isolationism and "nationalistic attitudes of the past" would be short-sighted.

November 1, 2008: Are Trends in Money Transfers to Latin America Shifting Downward? (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
Source: FOCALPoint (Canada)
With the financial crisis in the United States, speculation about the decline in remittances to Latin America has raised concern about the impact on the economies in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly among more remittance dependent countries. Such speculation has largely been associated to the decline of flows to Mexico, thus raising questions about the future of these flows on an international scale. However, these speculations may obscure a rather complex reality exclusive to Mexico’s history as well as to basic dynamics of migration and remitting.

October 29, 2008: Security and Human Rights in Mexico
By Roberto Mallen
Stephanie Brewer, international legal officer of the Miguel Agustín Pro Juárez Human Rights Center in Mexico City presented their new English-language report, Human Rights Under Siege, which addresses the erosion of the rule of law, the use of the military in public security and the increasing use of force to combat drug trafficking in Mexico.

October 27, 2008: U.S.-Latin American Relations: Recommendations for the New Administration
By Michael Shifter
Source: University of Virgina Miller Center Forum
It is crucial for senior policy officials responsible for Latin America in January 2009 to take a fresh and honest look at the divergent tendencies unfolding in the region. Tired notions about an area long regarded in the United States as its strategic prerogative should give way to a nuanced appreciation of the marked regional differentiation.

October 23, 2008: Financial crisis response challenges Brazilian and Mexican governments
By Allison Fritz
Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva’s "kingmaker" status in the 2010 national elections may be jeopardized by economic fallout from the global financial crisis, an analyst said Thursday at an Inter-American Dialogue event in Washington.

October 23, 2008: Miami Group discusses U.S.-Latin American relations after the November 4 election
By Landen Romei
At the fifth Miami Group dinner, participants discussed the incoming administration’s potential effect on Latin America. This exclusive event took place on October 23 at the beautiful apartment of Beatrice Rangel. An initial presentation by Michael Shifter, the Dialogue’s Vice President for Policy, was followed by comments from Marifeli Pérez-Stable and Peter Hakim.

October 7, 2008: What World Financial Policymakers Could Learn From the Mexican Collapse of Yesteryear
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
Today Mexico is suffering from the US slowdown, but its financial system is strong, and its economy very resilient in response of the strengthening of policies and institutions. Would it not be wise for US policymakers to leave their pride aside, and consult their brethren to the south, the IMF, and others for good advice on best practices for the financial system?

September 28, 2008: Optan migrantes por envíos en línea
By Silvia Garduño
Source: Reforma (Mexico)
Manuel Orozco quoted in article.

September 28, 2008: ‘Mienten’ paisanos sobre remesas
By Silvia Garduño
Source: Reforma (Mexico)
Manuel Orozco quoted in article.

September 22, 2008: Still More Expensive to Have a Big Mac—and to Compete—in Latin America
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
The Big Mac exchange rate index (just issued by the Economist magazine for 2008) is attractive in its ability to capture in a universal and simple fashion changes in relative purchasing power among countries. It has serious shortcomings, as it follows only one specific product, but it captures very well major changes in prices and exchange rates.

September 3, 2008: Afectan a las remesas políticas antimigrantes (PDF)
By Silvia Garduño
Source: Reforma (Mexico)
Manuel Orozco quoted in article.

August 22, 2008: Low Intra-Regional Trade Shows Region's Lack of Dynamism
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
It is by now a boring truism to say that trade and investment have exploded in the world—more so in the developing world. The rapid rise of Asia, together with a healthy recovery of Latin America and others, has brought new possibilities for the majority of emerging countries. However, developments have not been homogeneous: Asia has been engaged in a revolutionary transformation; Latin America has pursued integration efforts for a long time, but with considerably poorer results; and Africa is only now starting the process.

August 1, 2008: Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America: Third Edition
By Jorge I. Domínguez and Michael Shifter
Edited by Jorge I. Domínguez and Michael Shifter and featuring contributions from more than a dozen leading scholars of democratization studies, this volume provides a concise and up-to-date measure of the quality of democracy in Latin America.

July 31, 2008: Lecciones sabias
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: Encuentro en la Red
Cuba y EE UU tendrán relaciones normales cuando La Habana convierta la cercanía en un valor y Washington considere con seriedad las expectativas cubanas.

July 29, 2008: Latin American Business Environment Statistics Push Governments to Reform
By Tanwina Hossain
While proving to be an effective and necessary tool, panelists agreed that the World Bank’s “Ease of Doing Business” (EDB) index overlooked critical aspects of a nation’s business environment. An event at the Inter-American Dialogue on July 29, 2008 focused on the World Bank's index as well as other trends related to Latin America's business climate.

July 28, 2008: Calderon's Popularity Hinges on Success of Anti-Drug Effort
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable and Landen Romei
Source: Latin America Advisor
When Felipe Calderon assumed the presidency on December 2, 2006, his legitimacy was in question. On July 2, 2006, he had won the narrowest of victories over Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who cried fraud and proclaimed himself the "legitimate president."

July 17, 2008: Sober lessons from relations with Mexico
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Great powers have rarely tempered their actions out of respect for their weaker neighbors. U.S.-Mexican relations are a case in point. By 1850, Mexico had lost half of its territory to U.S. expansionism, a loss that suffused Mexican political culture with a mistrust of the United States that lingers still.

July 1, 2008: Las papas queman: causas y consecuencias de la carestia alimentaria (PDF)
By Nora Lustig
Source: NEXOS
Hasta hace poco tiempo, irónicamente, la queja principal de los países en desarrollo era que los precios de los productos agrícolas se mantenían artificialmente bajos en el mercado internacional—y con ello se dejaba fuera de la competencia a millones de productores--debido a la política de subsidios hacia el sector en los países avanzados. La injusticia prevaleciente en las reglas del juego, se decía, condenaba a una parte del mundo en desarrollo a vivir en la pobreza.

June 27, 2008: La Visita de McCain
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Tiempo (Colombia)
La visita de McCain puede no darle mucho en el aspecto electoral, pero indirectamente puede estimular un debate de mayor calidad, altamente necesario en Estados Unidos, al sacar a la luz los desafíos en Colombia y México.

June 27, 2008: McCain's Visit to Colombia
By Michael Shifter
Source: El Tiempo (Colombia)
McCain’s visit may not yield much for him electorally, but by shining a light on the challenges in Colombia and Mexico, it may indirectly help stimulate a higher quality and sorely needed debate on these pressing issues.

June 17, 2008: Violencia contra periodistas: Voz de alarma
By Denise Dresser
Source: Presentation at Conference on Violence against Journalists and Impunity in Mexico
México entre los 15 países del mundo más peligrosos para ser periodista.... Donde cargar con una grabadora o una cámara de televisión o una libreta puede ser una actividad de alto riesgo. Donde hacer preguntas incómodas puede acarrear consecuencias mortales.

June 17, 2008: Violence against Journalists and Impunity in Mexico
By Marco Morales
A closed discussion on the current threats to freedom of expression in Mexico.

June 12, 2008: The prospects for US/Latin American relations after a new US president takes office next year.
By Michael Shifter
Source: Oxford Analytica
With the presidential candidates set and the campaign underway, details about the Latin America policy of Senators Barack Obama and John McCain should become clearer, and key issues in hemispheric policy will feature in the general election campaign -- particularly immigration and trade.

June 6, 2008: Challenge for Mexican Education "Alliance" is Execution
By Jeffrey Puryear
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor
The "Alliance for Education Quality," approved on May 15 by Mexican President Felipe Calderon and the powerful head of the national teachers' union, Elba Esther Gordillo, aims to transform Mexico's poorly performing public schools into a key tool for promoting social advancement and international competitiveness.

May 27, 2008: México en guerra
By Joaquín Villalobos
Source: El Diario de Hoy (El Salvador)
La marihuana es considerada inofensiva y es la más popular de todas las drogas. Quienes la consumen no dimensionan la actividad criminal a la que dan soporte cuando la compran.

May 15, 2008: Former Mexican Foreign Minister Calls for Comprehensive Immigration Reform
By Ted Wells
A comprehensive solution that effectively addresses the issue of illegal migration into the United States is the most practical and effective policy for the next U.S. president according to Jorge Castañeda, Mexico’s foreign minister from 2000 to 2003. Addressing an audience at a discussion of his new book, Ex-Mex, at an event co-sponsored by the Migration Policy Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue, Castañeda called for a “holistic solution because piece-meal policies failed.”

May 15, 2008: Letter to the editor
By Nora Lustig
Source: The Economist

May 14, 2008: Members of Congress Discuss Trade and Poverty
By Megan Fletcher
A Congressional Members Working Group Dinner Discussion

May 8, 2008: Free trade could benefit all partners
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Free trade is getting a bum rap everywhere. Long gone is the spirit of the early 1990s when the Americas jointly raised the banner of integration.

April 22, 2008: Slowdown and Financial Turmoil in the US: Risks for Latin America's Economies
By Elisabeth Burgess for the Dialogue's Latin America Advisor
Latin America is in a good position to weather global economic turmoil sparked by the downturn in the United States, but the region—and especially its poor inhabitants—remain vulnerable, experts said on April 22.

April 13, 2008: Conselhos para o próximo presidente dos EUA
By Peter Hakim
Source: O Estado de São Paulo
Para reparar os danos, o próximo presidente terá de reverter as políticas globais da Casa Branca de George W. Bush.

April 13, 2008: Advice for the Next US President
By Peter Hakim
Source: O Estado de São Paulo Brazil
To repair the damage, the next American president will need to substantially reverse the global policies of the Bush White House while, paradoxically, sticking closely to the Administration’s substantive agenda for Latin America.

February 28, 2008: Latin American Labor Protections Increase Informality, Poverty
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue's Latin America Advisor.
Latin American labor markets are a portrait of contradictions: complex and far-reaching worker protection legislation, significant unemployment, and a high degree of economic informality, not to speak of poverty and inequality.

February 25, 2008: Cross Border Challenges in US-Mexico Relations
By Corbett Hix
Three Mexican governors from border states discussed issues specific to their unique relationship with the United States.

February 22, 2008: Se va Bush, ¿qué viene? (PDF)
By Michael Shifter
Source: Perú Económico
Los latinoamericanos y quienes siguen los sucesos en la región crecientemente se hacen la inevitable pregunta: ¿Cómo cambiará la nueva administración la política de EEUU hacia América Latina?

February 20, 2008: Preocupante ranking de desempeño estudiantil
By Jeffrey Puryear
Source: Publicado en el Latin America Advisor, el boletín diario del Diálogo Interamericano.
Una vez más los países de Latinoamérica se ubicaron en los últimos lugares de un ranking que clasifica a países de acuerdo con los puntajes promedio obtenidos en una prueba internacional de desempeño estudiantil. ¿Cómo podemos interpretar este pobre resultado?

February 7, 2008: Michael Shifter: Si Obama o Clinton ganan finalmente las elecciones, la relación de EE.UU. con América Latina mejorará
By Michael Shifter (interview)
Source: ideele Radio (Peru)
Si Barack Obama o Hillary Clinton, logran finalmente ganar las elecciones presidenciales en Estados Unidos, la relación entre este país y América Latina mejorará, pues se abriría un mayor clima de confianza, aseguró el vicepresidente de Diálogo Interamericano, Michael Shifter.

February 4, 2008: The Macroeconomic Environment for Competitiveness in Latin America (PDF)
By Claudio M. Loser
Under the basic premise that macroeconomic stability is a pre-condition for competitiveness, this article reviews some of the key principles that determine the basis for good macroeconomic performance, the recent experience of the region in this regard, and some lessons for the future. Reproduced with permission of Palgrave Macmillan. NOTE: This extract is taken from the author's original manuscript and has not been reviewed or edited. The definitive version of this extract may be found in the work Can Latin America Compete?: confronting the challenges of globalization edited by Jerry Haar and John Price, which can be purchased from http://www.palgrave-usa.com/catalog/product.aspx?isbn=1403975434.

February 1, 2008: Building Human Capital: Is Latin American Education Competitive? (PDF)
By Jeffrey Puryear and Tamara Ortega Goodspeed
Source: Can Latin America Compete?: Confronting the Challenges of Globalization (Haar and Price, ed.)
Latin America’s ability to compete successfully in global markets depends significantly on the quality of its labor force, which in turn depends on the quality of its schools. By making learning the chief measure of success and making schools accountable to citizens, countries can take a major step forward in strengthening their competitiveness. Reproduced with permission of Palgrave Macmillan. NOTE: This extract is taken from the author's original manuscript and has not been reviewed or edited.

February 1, 2008: A New Path for Latin America? (PDF)
By Michael Shifter
Source: Current History
Even without the constitutional amendments, Chávez’s unbridled ambition and appetite for power have already produced virtual one-man rule, devoid of any institutional checks or constraints. Latin America, it appears, must find other models for effective governance and sustainable prosperity.

January 30, 2008: Still Unclear if NAFTA Has Reduced Poverty, Inequality in Mexico
By Elisabeth Burgess for the Dialogue's Latin America Advisor
How NAFTA, Migration, and Government Policy Affect Mexico's Poor

January 29, 2008: Latin America Not Immune from Global Economic Shocks
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor.
The classic and extremely funny 1980 movie "The Gods Must Be Crazy" shows the impact of the casual drop of a Coca Cola bottle from a helicopter on an isolated African tribe and the havoc it creates. Some analysts see a parallel in the recent turmoil in the financial and asset markets as being effectively caused only by the collapse of the "subprime" mortgage market.

January 29, 2008: Members of Congress Discuss the Mérida Initiative
By Bryce Pardo
A Congressional Members Working Group Dinner Discussion

January 28, 2008: The Forgotten Continent: Political and Economic Progress in Latin America
By Nancy Castillo
A conversation with Michael Reid, Americas editor of The Economist.

January 26, 2008: Cae envío de remesas (PDF)
By Silvia Garduño
Source: Reforma (Mexico)
Manuel Orozco quoted in article.

January 19, 2008: México y Venezuela: compañías petroleras
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable and Christian Gómez
Source: El Universal
El 3 de enero y por primera vez, los precios del petróleo crudo rompieron la barrera de los 100 dólares por barril. Y si bien los precios se han enfriado desde entonces, y cayeron por debajo de los 90 dólares el 16 de enero, la demanda mundial por el combustible no muestra señales de abatimiento.

January 18, 2008: A Discussion with Denise Dresser on President Felipe Calderón's First Year in Office
By Ted Wells
A Strong Start for Calderón

January 18, 2008: Venezuela, Mexico Need to Reform State Oil Companies
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable and Christian Gómez, Jr.
Source: Latin America Advisor
On January 3, crude oil futures broke $100 a barrel for the first time ever. While prices have cooled since then, falling below $90 a barrel on January 16, worldwide demand for oil shows no signs of abating. Although high oil prices have led to soaring government revenues for the main oil-producing countries in Latin America, continued high prices will affect each country differently. The main factor is the behavior of national oil companies.

January 14, 2008: Congress has mixed feelings about the Mérida Initiative
By Bryce Pardo
Three senior U.S. congressional staff speak on President Bush’s proposed Mérida Initiative.

January 11, 2008: Un país ‘fundido’
By Homero Campa
Source: AM (Mexico)
Manuel Orozco quoted in article.

December 17, 2007: Six Latin American Countries' Test Scores Near Bottom—Again
By Jeffrey Puryear
Source: Published in the Dialogue's Latin America Advisor.
Once again Latin America has scored near the bottom in a major international test of student achievement. How should we interpret its poor showing?

December 1, 2007: La nueva dependencia de América Latina: El papel de sus líderes políticos frente a una nueva oportunidad (PDF)
By Michael Shifter
Source: ideele (Peru)
En el 2007, un importante consenso parece estar creándose en América Latina. La mayoría coincide ahora en que el alto crecimiento económico, la reducción de la pobreza e incluso una cierta mejora en la reducción de la desigualdad son cambios bienvenidos y positivos, pero que no necesariamente mitigan la profunda frustración que sufren muchos en la región.

November 13, 2007: Members of Congress Discuss Remittance Flows to Latin America
By Nina Agrawal
A Congressional Members Working Group Dinner Discussion

November 1, 2007: Miami Group Launches with Mexican Finance Minister Agustín Carstens
By Christian Gomez
Mexican finance minister Agustín Carstens addressed a group of corporate, financial, and civic leaders from South Florida.

October 30, 2007: Calderón se consolida tras un año de gobierno
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: Infolatam
El 1º de diciembre Felipe Calderón cumple un año al frente de México. Por las controversias suscitadas por la elección de 2006 y la resistencia a admitir sus resultados de parte de Andrés Manuel López Obrador y un sector del Partido de la Revolución Democrática, México parecía abocado a un largo período de incertidumbre.

October 23, 2007: Members of Congress Discuss Press Freedom in Mexico and Colombia
By Nina Agrawal
A Congressional Members Working Group Dinner Discussion

October 23, 2007: Violence, Democracy, and Press Freedom in Mexico and Colombia
By Lindsay Flowers
Experts Discuss Parallel Threats to Press Freedom in Colombia and Mexico

October 16, 2007: Security Challenges in Latin America
By Elisabeth Burgess for the Dialogue's Latin America Advisor
US Worried Venezuelan Arms Buildup Has "Gone Over a Line"

October 11, 2007: Dispirited democracies open door to populism
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
These days democracy is its own worst enemy in Latin America. Where equality before the law is just a phrase, institutions are fiefdoms and economic growth doesn't sustain improving living standards, democracy sows a popular desencanto, a malaise and populism steps in.

October 2, 2007: Toward the Mainstream: Remittances and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
Testimony presented before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere at the hearing entitled, “Leveraging Remittances for Families and Communities”. October 2, 2007.

October 1, 2007: How Competitive are Latin America’s Schools? (PDF)
By Tamara Ortega Goodspeed and Jeffrey Puryear
Source: FOCALPoint
Good education prepares people to work and lays the foundation for stronger institutions, greater transparency and good governance - all of which allow economies to function smoothly. Unfortunately, Latin American schools are not very competitive - with major failings in quantity, quality and equity.

September 29, 2007: Nuevas guerras y viejas izquierdas
By Joaquín Villalobos
Published in El País - La violencia es ahora fragmentada, multidireccional, sin reglas, sin propósito claro y sostenida por una economía informal-criminal. Algo así como en una lucha de todos contra todos. El resultado no es la victoria de un bando, sino la fragmentación de la sociedad y la privatización de la violencia, con la consiguiente pérdida del monopolio de ésta por parte del Estado.

September 25, 2007: Carlos Slim's Wealth Comes at Mexico's Expense
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable and Christian Gómez, Jr.
Source: Latin America Advisor
According to Fortune magazine, Mexican mogul Carlos Slim has surpassed Microsoft founder Bill Gates as the world's richest man. Slim's estimated $59 billion empire—which includes over 200 companies in telecommunications, construction, tobacco, mining, and banking, among others—constitutes a third of the Mexican stock market and more than five percent of the country's 2006 GDP.

September 19, 2007: Discussion on Current Trends in Remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean
By Elisabeth Burgess for the Dialogue's Financial Services Advisor
Money Transfer Operators Not Worried About Bank Competition

September 13, 2007: Calderón on the right track
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
What a difference a year makes. Last September, Felipe Calderón's razor-thin presidential win still stung Mexico. Andrés Manuel López Obrador, known as AMLO, proclaimed himself ''legitimate president'' and Calderón, a ''usurper.''

September 1, 2007: Trade and Investment in the Americas (PDF)
By Inter-American Dialogue
Report of the Tenth Anniversary Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF) Conference on September 7-8, 2006.

August 30, 2007: Better opportunities await Cuba
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
An era is ending. With Fidel Castro's inevitable passing, neither Latin America nor Cuba will ever be the same. The Comandante has always valued ideas -- i.e., his own -- over the prosaic -- i.e., ordinary people. Since Cuba alone never satisfied his supersized ego, he looked elsewhere, Latin America in particular.

August 19, 2007: Help Mexico with costs of the drug war (PDF)
By Michael Shifter
Published in The Miami Herald For the health of our southern neighbor's nascent democracy and the strengthening of our own border controls, it is fundamental that the United States and Mexico enhance their cooperation.

August 14, 2007: Region Still Lags Developed World in Ability to Buy a Big Mac
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue's Latin America Advisor.
Somewhat more than two years ago, I wrote in this column about the Big Mac index of costs and wages, based on the well-known work published in The Economist ... I believe it is time to revisit the subject.

June 27, 2007: Study Shows Doing Business in Latin America is Not Easy
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue's Latin America Advisor.
A common frustration of domestic and foreign investors in Latin America is the complexity involved in doing business in the region, and thus difficulties in engaging in new investments.

June 7, 2007: Democracy brings stability, economic progress
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
The arrogance of power: that's how William Fulbright depicted Lyndon Johnson's conduct of the Vietnam War in the 1960s. Two decades later, Mikhail Gorbachev attributed the same to the Soviet Union's Communist Party.

May 23, 2007: Data on Latin America's Rich Highlights Region's Inequality
By Claudio Loser
Source: Published in the Dialogue’s Latin America Advisor.
Forbes Magazine announced recently that Mexico's Carlos Slim, with assets over $50 billion, is now the second-richest man in the world ... It is a fairly inordinate position for a Latin American, because the region represents about 4.5 percent of world wealth.

March 15, 2007: Trip benefits yet to come
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
President Bush came home yesterday. Was his six-day trip to Latin America worth it? The short answer is a modest Yes.

March 10, 2007: Repairing Latin Relations (PDF)
By Interview with Peter Hakim
Source: National Journal
With the influence of anti-American firebrand Hugo Chavez spreading like Venezuela's petrodollars throughout Latin America, President Bush began an extended trip to the region on March 8, armed with a host of economic initiatives and aid packages. His travels are taking him and first lady Laura Bush to Brazil, Uruguay, Colombia, Guatemala, and Mexico.

March 6, 2007: Bush's opportunity to mend relations
By Peter Hakim
Source: Miami Herald
President Bush's week-long visit to Latin America comes at a delicate moment for U.S. relations with the region. Anti-U.S. feeling is deep and pervasive -- and insistently fanned by Washington's chief adversary, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez.

March 2, 2007: Calderón needs to push the envelope
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
After candidate Vicente Fox upended the Institutional Revolutionary Party's electoral machinery in 2000, Mexican expectations soared. As president, however, Fox was cowed by the PRI state he inherited.

March 1, 2007: U.S. Policy Towards Latin America
By Peter Hakim
A little more than a year ago, I published an article that started with the sentence: “US relations with Latin America have reached their lowest point since the end of the Cold War.” The change in the State Department’s leadership on Latin America has since then clearly improved the tone of the relationship and eased its surface tension. And there is other good news to report.

February 18, 2007: Bush y su nueva mirada a Latinoamérica
By Michael Shifter
Source: La Tercera (Chile)
La intención puede ser sincera, y los esfuerzos por parte de los altos diplomáticos admirable, pero el entorno geopolítico no es favorable para una relación revigorizada con América Latina.

February 1, 2007: Latin America's Drug Problem (PDF)
By Michael Shifter
Source: Current History
With violence mounting in Mexico and Brazil, and a real risk of deterioration spreading across much of the region, dealing with the drug crisis clearly requires a sharper focus and more imaginative approaches.

September 29, 2006: Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America: Is Progress Being Made?
By Dan Joyce
On September 29, 2006, Thomas Shannon, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, along with many other prominent academics and policymakers, participated in the Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America Conference organized by the Inter-American Dialogue.

September 21, 2006: Calderón, al centro
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: El País
La decisión del Tribunal Electoral del Poder Judicial de la Federación dio por terminada -de manera definitiva e inapelable- la controvertida elección mexicana. Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, del Partido de Acción Nacional (PAN), es el presidente electo.

September 14, 2006: Mexico: Calderón Must Stand Above the Partisan Fray
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Mexico is deeply polarized. Calderón must stand above the partisan fray.

August 1, 2006: PREAL Working Paper No. 36: Dos Clases de Políticas Educativas. La Política de las Políticas Públicas (PDF)
By Juan Carlos Navarro
This paper, originally published as chapter 10 in The Politics of Public Policy by the Inter-American Development Bank, examines the political challenges facing six policy initiatives in four countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. The analysis distinguishes between policy initiatives with broad political support and those that face political resistance because of their impact on powerful interest groups. Spanish.

July 20, 2006: López Obrador has a weak case
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Was there fraud in Mexico's presidential election on July 2? Andrés Manuel López Obrador has a weak case.

July 6, 2006: Where parties stand after the balloting
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Mexico's July 2 presidential election remains too close to call.

June 23, 2006: Seven Questions: Mexico’s Presidential Race
By Michael Shifter
Source: Foreign Policy
Mexico’s summer is especially hot this year as a tight presidential race draws to a close. FP spoke with Michael Shifter, Latin America Expert, about the campaign, widespread disappointment with Vicente Fox, and the state of Mexican democracy.

February 2, 2006: Contest for Mexico's presidency
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
On July 2, Mexicans will choose a new president. Were the election held today, Andrés Manuel López Obrador would win Los Pinos -- the Mexican White House -- for the Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD).

January 1, 2006: Mexico's Uneasy Choice: The 2006 Presidential Election (PDF)
By Daniel P. Erikson
Source: World Policy Journal
Mexico's democracy has freed itself from its authoritarian past, yet it is faltering in its quest to become a modern nation. The country shed the one-party system that Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa once described as "the perfect dictatorship," only to witness its new multiparty system descend into political paralysis. It escaped the cycle of economic crisis that bankrupted the previous generations, only to watch as financial stability was steadily eroded by shifts in the global economy that have drained jobs and investment. Improved living standards and longer life expectancy have changed its demographic profile, but Mexico may never grow wealthy enough to pay for its citizens who reach old age. Mexico's next president will face decisions on immigration, security, and economic policy that will require breaking the persistent gridlock that has become the downside of the democratic transition.

September 1, 2005: Common-sense recommendations
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Drug-related violence and illegal immigration have tensed U.S.-Mexican relations. In the U.S. border states, anti-Mexican sentiments are growing.

August 4, 2005: Inching toward more democracy, less discrimination
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Are Mexicans racist? From the U.S perspective, two recent incidents would have us answer Yes.

May 26, 2005: Cuba-Mexico relations strained to the brink
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Mexico has a Cuba problem. After its vote for the resolution critical of the Cuban government at the U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva, Havana fired a fusillade of insults.

March 31, 2005: Much remains unchanged in country's politics (Microsoft Word)
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Once in office, Fox quickly dissipated the aura of expectation. Public opinion has long considered the president clueless politically.

January 20, 2005: Other regions ahead in economic growth
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Latin America is lagging. China and India are leaping ahead.

November 11, 2004: Long way to go to implement solid reforms
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Time is not on Mexico's side. Consolidated democracies such as the United States, Canada and Western Europe took decades to settle democratic institutions, forge open societies and empower their citizens.

October 28, 2004: Fox missed chance for greatness
By Marifeli Pérez-Stable
Source: The Miami Herald
Those were the days that ended -- no, vanished -- while Mexicans still relished Vicente Fox's dislodging of the PRI from the presidency. In 2001, Mexico had a golden opportunity to become Latin America's Spain: a democratic transition that laid solid democratic foundations after decades of authoritarianism or, at least, that was the hope.

March 31, 2004: Mexican Hometown Associations and Development Opportunities (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
International migration significantly influences the politics and economics of many countries today. Migration and worker remittances, in particular, support economic growth in sending countries all over the world. Through remittances, migration has created new opportunities for social and economic change in rural areas. However, remittances are only part of a broader phenomenon of transnationalism. Transnational immigration networks are contributing to the integration of countries into the global economy, demonstrated through various levels of economic interconnectedness, including immigrantbased donations, small and large investments, trade, tourism, and unilateral transfers.

January 11, 2004: Summit goal: Get FTAA back on track
By Peter Hakim
On Monday, President Bush will travel to Monterrey, Mexico, for a summit meeting with the Western Hemisphere's 33 other elected heads of state.

September 1, 2003: US Security Policy Speech Presented at the Consejo Empresario de América Latina (CEAL) Conference and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Hemispheric Security Conference
By Peter Hakim
This essay seeks to answer three questions. What are the main elements of the US post-9/11 security agenda worldwide? What does Washington expect of Latin America nations regarding security matters? How does the US security agenda affect US policy toward Latin America generally?

May 11, 2003: Bush's Game of Revenge
By Peter Hakim
Source: Los Angeles Times
The first President Bush envisioned the United States and Latin America as a hemisphere-wide economic community. The second President Bush seems to have abandoned his father's vision and substituted a winners-losers game based on the question: Did you support me in my quest to oust Saddam Hussein?

March 31, 2003: Alca em 2005 é quase impossível, diz analista dos EUA
By Peter Hakim
Source: Agencia Estado
Será "quase impossível" que a Área de Livre Comércio das Américas (Alca) seja criada na data programada, janeiro de 2005, na opinião de Peter Hakim, presidente do Inter-American Dialogue, um dos principais centros de análise de políticas norte-americanas e de assuntos do Hemisfério Ocidental, com sede em Washington.

March 28, 2003: LATIN AMERICA/US: War strains ties and harms growth
By Peter Hakim
Source: Oxford Analytica
Negative consequences arising from the war in Iraq.

February 1, 2003: Latin America's New Political Leaders: Walking in a Wire
By Michael Shifter
Source: Current History
Today’s underlying political currents in Latin America are less about ideology and more about a public desire to find leaders who can effectively address everyday problems, and who do so honestly. The formulas of the past—whether ‘socialism’ in the 1970s or ‘neoliberalism’ in the 1990s—have been widely questioned, and largely dismissed. With traditional ideas and structures breaking apart, new leaders are being called on to produce results.

January 12, 2003: How Free Trade Will Alter a Hemisphere
By Interview with Peter Hakim
Source: New York Times
Last week, the Bush administration opened negotiations to create a free-trade agreement similar to Nafta with five Central American countries, a large step in the administration's plans for a free-trade zone throughout the Western Hemisphere.

October 2, 2001: Don't forget Latin America
By Peter Hakim
Source: Christian Science Monitor
Things have not been going well in Latin America for some time. The events of Sept. 11 are making the situation worse.

March 1, 2001: The Uneasy Americas
By Peter Hakim
Source: Foreing Affairs
This April, President George W. Bush will travel to Quebec City for a summit meeting of the western hemisphere's heads of state.

February 1, 2001: Message from Latin America: Start—but Don’t Stop—with Mexico
By Peter Hakim
Source: Christian Science Monitor
Most Latin Americans were pleased that President Bush made his first foreign trip to Mexico—seeing it as the necessary forerunner of enhanced US attention to the entire region.

February 1, 2001: United States–Latin American Relations: Preparing for the Handover
By Michael Shifter
Source: Current History
Whether the United States can resist the unilateral temptation and respond more constructively to the concerns of Mexico and other Latin American countries—and to the practical challenges of working with its neighbors—may be the defining question for inter-American relations in the early part of the new century.

June 1, 2000: The Developmental Role of Remittances in U.S. Latino Communities and in Latin American Countries (PDF)
By Lindsey Lowell and Rodolfo O. de la Garza
For international migrants seeking employment in the United States, the desire to remit a portion of their earnings home is a time-honored motivator. Although the basic facts surrounding remittances to Mexico and Central America have changed little in recent decades, the flow of money southward from the United States has taken on significant new features. Since the 1980s, remittances have averaged 26 percent annual growth in the countries of focus in this project, i.e., Mexico, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Colombia. Today, officially recorded remittances to these countries total $8 billion.

June 1, 2000: Latino Hometown Associations as Agents of Development in Latin America (PDF)
By Manuel Orozco
In this paper, Dr. Manuel Orozco examines Latino hometown associations (HTAs) and their considerable growth over the past decade. These organizations are formed by groups of immigrants hailing from the same towns. While their focus has been primarily on supporting the immigrant community in the United States, in recent years a growing number of HTAs have begun to send collective remittances back home for community development projects such as paving roads, building schools, and buying ambulances. Dr. Orozco studies HTAs formed by Domincans, Guatemalans, Mexicans, and Salvadorans in several cities in the United States. He concludes that there are several characteristics common to almost all HTAs, including their informal and voluntary structure, sporadic relationships with municipalities in the hometowns, and small economic base.

April 17, 2000: The Development of Home Town Associations in the United States and the Use of Social Remittances in Mexico (PDF)
By Rafael Alarcón
Money remittances between the United States and Mexico are in the process of evolving from the province of individuals and households toward the increasing involvement of hometown associations (HTAs). These associations are based on the social networks established by community members of the same rural locality of origin in Mexico. The members of these associations, commonly known as "clubs," seek to promote the well-being of their community in both the United States and Mexico by raising money to fund public works and social projects. These associations pay particular attention to the needs of low-income persons who live in Mexico.

January 1, 2000: Do Government Programs "Crowd in" Remittances?
By J. Edward Taylor
In this paper, Dr. J. Edward Taylor of the University of California, Davis looks at the remittance behavior of Mexican immigrant households in the US, focusing on the impact of US transfer payments on remittances. The analysis seeks to answer the question of whether US governmental supplements increase monies sent home. Using data from two Mexican migrant communities, Taylor concludes that welfare and other means-tested government programs, such as Food Stamps and Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), do not appear to subsidize households in Mexico. On average, however, immigrant families do share non-means-tested transfers, such as Social Security, with relatives in Mexico.

December 31, 1998: 1998 Report of Activities (PDF)
By The Inter-American Dialogue
1998 was a productive year for the Dialogue. Three priorities guided our work - (1) making the Dialogue fully inter-American, (2) rejuvenating our core membership and participants in other networks, and (3) renewing the substantive agenda of issues we address to ensure the Dialogue is dealing with the most important challenges in fresh and creative ways.

December 1, 1998: Participación, Representación y Liderazgo Político de la Mujer en America Latina (PDF)
By Mala N. Htun
El surgimiento de movimientos de masas de mujeres en los años setenta y ochenta y su destacado papel en la lucha contra los regímenes autoritarios del continente crearon grandes expectativas de mejores oportunidades para la mujer una vez producido el retorno a la democracia.

January 1, 1998: Immigration in U.S.-Mexican Relations (PDF)
By The Inter-American Dialogue and the Brookings Institution
Few nations share as long a border as do mexico and the United States - certainly, no two nations with such disparate incomes and long tradition of both authorized and unauthorized migration.

March 1, 1995: The New Governments of Brazil and Mexico: What Lies Ahead? (PDF)
By The Inter-American Dialogue
Reversals of fortune - between Brazil and Mexico - was the central theme of the conference. The optimism-pessimism juxtaposition was noted by many participants.

May 1, 1993: Toward an Era of Hemispheric Cooperation (PDF)
By The Inter-American Dialogue and the Brookings Institution
In the thirty years since President Kennedy announced the Alliance for Progress, no U.S. initiative has generated more interest and excitement in Latin America than President Bush's June 1990 proposal for a Western Hemisphere Free Trade system that would eliminate barriers to commerce among all the countries of the world.

September 18, 1992: The State of Latin American Finance (PDF)
By Pedro Aspe, Carlos Boloña, Ricardo Hausmann, and Alejandro Foxley
Pedro Aspe, Mexico's Secretary of Finance and Public Credit, Carlos Boloña, Peru's Minister of Economy and Finance, and Ricardo Hausmann, Venezuela's Minister of State, shared with us their plans and prospects for guiding their countries through this time of transition in Latin America. Key themes of all the discussions were financial stabilization, market liberalization, debt reduction, and insertion into the global economy. They also commented on the evolving political climate in their respective countries, and on the complex interplay between financial and political variables.